5 Questions

Steve Blank speaking at a conference on startups

Photo by Alison Elliott

Tech entrepreneur and author Steve Blank puts “founders who go too far” into the context of the last several decades of entrepreneurship.
Orhan Pamuk, Author

Photo by Elena Seibert

Orhan Pamuk, the Robert Yik-Fong Tam Professor of the Humanities and professor of writing in the School of the Arts, is one of Turkey's most prominent novelis

Safwan Masri in a navy blue jacket, tie and white shirt.

In 2011, Tunisia’s Jasmine Revolution inspired the Arab Spring, a wave of protest movements across the Middle East and North Africa that held the promise of a new political future for the region.

Gillian Metzger smiling

Photo Courtesy of Columbia Law School

The U.S. Supreme Court begins its new term with a full complement of nine justices and what is "shaping up to be a big case term,” said Gillian Metzger.
Carol Sanger standing behind a podium and in front of a chalkboard.

Carol Sanger started writing About Abortion: Terminating Pregnancy in Twenty-First-Century America (Harvard University Press) shortly after Barack Obama (CC’83) won the 2008 presidential election.

Richard Betts

Richard K. Betts, the Arnold A. Saltzman Professor of War and Peace Studies in the political science department, is widely known as an expert on U.S. foreign relations and national security.

Columbia News followed up with David Pozen, a noted scholar of constitutional law at Columbia Law School, on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals' consideration whether to extend a temporary stay of the travel ban.
Andrew Gelman

With the presidential election just two weeks away, the latest polls suggest that Hillary Clinton will win, some saying her chances are better than 90 percent. But individual poll results vary widely and some still give Trump a chance of turning things around.

Rodolfo de la Garza
Who will turn out to vote on November 8? Rodolfo de la Garza, Eaton Professor of Administrative Law and Municipal Science and Professor of International and Public Affairs, has insight into a key block of voters: Latinos.
Richard Briffault Law School

The last seven years have seen a slew of state laws enacted that require voters to have government-issued identification to combat in-person voter fraud.  That, in turn, has set up a series of challenges to those laws, many of which have been scaled back or overturned by federal courts.

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