Architecture

John Reddick

Photo courtesy of Apollo Theater Education Program

John Reddick is one of 18 northern Manhattan residents selected by the University to pursue research projects and develop their skills at Columbia.
National Museum of African American History & Culture

National Museum of African American History & Culture - Photo by Alan Karchmer/NMAAHC

To write the book about the new National Museum of African American History and Culture, Mabel O.

One World Trade Center under construction, at 200 feet above street level (in addition to 60 feet below grade), March 2010. Courtesy of The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

In "Power at Ground Zero: Politics, Money, and the Remaking of Lower Manhattan," Lynne Sagalyn recounts the efforts to symbolize American resilience, project American power and memorialize the human losses of that day.

Renzo Piano, principal and founder of Renzo Piano Building Workshop describes the inspiration for the design of the campus.

 

These are some of the projects underway at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation’s GSAPP Incubator that supports recent alumni seeking to develop innovative architectural and design projects.
Hadrian's Villa Columbia University Archeology
Twenty miles east of Rome lies the villa of the emperor Hadrian, who ruled for about 20 years during the second century A.D., but whose lavish estate has exercised a strong influence on architects and artists since its rediscovery in the 15th century.
NYC's Main Post Office 1901-1939

New York City’s main post office, completed in 1901, was torn down in 1939 to make way for an extension of City Hall.

When Andrew Dolkart was a student at Colgate University in the early 1970s, he was an avid reader of Ada Louise Huxtable’s architecture columns in The New York Times.

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger today announced his appointment of Amale Andraos as the next dean of the University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation.

Look up! As you walk through some of New York’s best-loved public spaces, you’ll see the magnificent work of Spanish immigrant Rafael Guastavino, who, with his son Rafael Jr., figured out how to decorate the grand domes and arches of America’s leading Beaux-Arts architects.

After a cross-country journey through the American heartland where many of Frank Lloyd Wright’s iconic houses still stand, the vast archives of the towering American architect have arrived in New York City.

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