Arts

Brad Lubman, of Ensemble Signal, speaks about the composer and conductor Oliver Knussen and gives a preview of repertoire programmed for the upcoming Miller Theatre Composer Portrait on April 18, 2013.

Artworks by contemporary Cambodian artists, including survivors of the Khmer Rouge genocide, are on display at Columbia’s Maison Française and Italian Academy. The exhibition takes place in conjunction with the city-wide Season of Cambodia Festival this spring.

This exhibit at Maison Française and The Italian Academy for Advanced Studies at Columbia University, open until May 4, features seventy works of visual arts (paintings, drawings, photographs) about the Cambodian genocide under the Khmer Rouge, made by the great contemporary artists Vann N

Learn more about Robert S. Duncanson: An Antebellum African American Artist, on exhibit at the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery through December 8, 2012 Visitor Information Hours Robert S. Duncanson: An Antebellum African American Artist.

New Gallery Showcases “Superheroes: Latino Immigrants Who Make New York” Spider-man clings to the side of a building, cleaning windows; Wonder Woman does a load of laundry; and Superman delivers take-out.

The Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture, founded in 1982, has never shied away from examining important social issues.

Prize-winning playwright David Henry Hwang doesn’t mind being labeled an Asian-American dramatist. “It’s literally true,” he said during a recent visit to Columbia. “I am Asian-American and I am a dramatist, and I write about Asian-American subjects quite a lot.

The Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery has mounted a new show that aims to expand the public’s understanding of the challenging terrain of conceptual art.

Columbia University and Ambassador Jean Kennedy Smith are pleased to announce that Dominique Morisseau’s Detroit ‘67 is the 2014 winner of the Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History

Referencing history, art and the subconscious, Paolo Ventura’s photographs function as architectural relics of the imagination, portraying characters and scenarios that are magical, poignant and strangely familiar—he calls them invented worlds.

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