Biology

Amelia Wolf walking through a field of flowers and a mountain scenery behind her.

Amelia Wolf in the California field she used to study what effect diversity loss would have on the remaining plants.

Gardeners and nature lovers have noticed that plants are flowering earlier every year—a phenomenon generally attributed to climate change.

Columbia University researchers have developed an extremely low-cost, low-maintenance, on-site dipstick test they hope will aid in the surveillance and early detection of fungal pathogens responsible for major human disease, agricultural damage and food spoilage worldwide.

In this cover drawing for Cell Reports, Columbia researchers illustrate the concept that neurons fire in a consistent pattern during a seizure no matter how quickly the seizure spreads. The above string pattern stays the same regardless of whether both hands move closer or farther apart. (Michael Wenzel) 

Of the 50 million people who suffer from epilepsy worldwide, a third fail to respond to medication. As the search for better drugs continues, researchers are still trying to make sense of how seizures start and spread.

A new study indicates that the number of plant and animal species at risk of extinction may be considerably higher than previously thought. A team of researchers, however, believe they’ve come up with a formula that will help paint a more accurate picture.

Illustration by Nicoletta Barolini

Researchers at Columbia University have made a significant step toward breaking the so-called “color barrier” of light microscopy for biological systems, allowing for much more comprehensive, system-wide labeling and imaging of a greater number of biomolecules in living cells and tissues t

J. Thomas Vaughan

Photo by Jeffrey Schifman

Last year, J. Thomas Vaughan joined Columbia as director of Magnetic Resonance Research, a new University-wide position.

From the chimera in Greek mythology to the sphinx in ancient Egypt, humans have imagined making creatures from pieces of different organisms for millennia.

This summer’s announcement that the Large Hadron Supercollider in Geneva had detected likely proof of the Higgs boson, an elusive and long-sought particle, brought back memories for Columbia neuroscientist Larry Abbott.

Image: NASA/A. Fujii

Nicolaus Copernicus, the 16th-century Polish astronomer and mathematician, wasn’t the first to suggest that the Earth wasn’t the center of the universe—the idea originated with the ancient Greeks—but he was the first to prove it with a mathematical theorem.

A new algorithm called Wanderlust uses single-cell measurements to detect how marker expression changes across development.

In a new paper published in the journal "Cell," a team of researchers led by Dana Pe’er at Columbia University and Garry Nolan at Stanford University describes a powerful new method for mapping cellular development at the single cell level.

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