Biology

J. Thomas Vaughan

Photo by Jeffrey Schifman

Last year, J. Thomas Vaughan joined Columbia as director of Magnetic Resonance Research, a new University-wide position.

From the chimera in Greek mythology to the sphinx in ancient Egypt, humans have imagined making creatures from pieces of different organisms for millennia.

This summer’s announcement that the Large Hadron Supercollider in Geneva had detected likely proof of the Higgs boson, an elusive and long-sought particle, brought back memories for Columbia neuroscientist Larry Abbott.

Image: NASA/A. Fujii

Nicolaus Copernicus, the 16th-century Polish astronomer and mathematician, wasn’t the first to suggest that the Earth wasn’t the center of the universe—the idea originated with the ancient Greeks—but he was the first to prove it with a mathematical theorem.

A new algorithm called Wanderlust uses single-cell measurements to detect how marker expression changes across development.

In a new paper published in the journal "Cell," a team of researchers led by Dana Pe’er at Columbia University and Garry Nolan at Stanford University describes a powerful new method for mapping cellular development at the single cell level.

Columbia campus

W. Ian Lipkin, MD, John Snow Professor of Epidemiology at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and director of the school’s Center for Infection and Immunity, was named recipient of Villanova University’s 2014 Mendel Medal. Dr.

In a study published today in Nature Communications, a research team led by Ken Shepard, professor of electrical engineering and biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, and Lars Dietrich, assistant professor of biological sciences at Columbia University, has demonstrated that integ

Five Columbia faculty members have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the world’s largest general scientific society.

DNA curtains—devised by P&S professor Eric Greene—provide a new way to study DNA-protein interactions. DNA strands are green; proteins are pink. Image: Eric Greene.

Using a dazzling technology to watch proteins collide, clutch, and slide along strands of DNA, researchers at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons and UC-Berkeley report online in Nature that they have uncovered some of the secrets behind a powerful new genetic engineer

An evaporation harvesting device made of Legos, a spore-coated rubber sheet, a coil and a magnet. The device produces electricity when sheet bends and straightens in response to moisture. Image Credit: Xi Chen/Columbia University

Legos may seem like an unlikely foundation for scientific research, but the building blocks have been a part of Ozgur Sahin’s work since he made a mechanical adding device with them when he was 11.

Pages