Biology

Images of various preparations used to study traumatic brain injury in Barclay Morrison's laboratory. Left: a mixed culture of brain cells stained for neurons (green) and auxiliary brain cells (red). Center: a hippocampal slice stained for inhibitory neurons (green). Right: a living hippocampal culture on a microelectrode array (black dots) to record neuronal activity after injury.

Barclay Morrison, an associate professor of biomedical engineering, compares the brain's physical response to traumatic brain injury to, of all things, a gelatin dessert.

Columbia to Award the 2012 Horwitz Prize to Richard Losick, Joe Lutkenhaus, and Lucy Shapiro for Discovering the Intracellular Structure of Bacterial Cells

Martin Chalfie

Martin Chalfie, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Biological Sciences, was awarded the first Golden Goose Award, honoring basic science research that initially seems obscure but leads to findings with significant health and economic benefits.

Michael Sheetz of Columbia University was named co-winner of this year’s Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award for discoveries related to cytoskeletal motor proteins, agents that move cargo within cells, contract muscles, and enable cell movements, the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundatio

Tom Maniatis and Michael Sheetz

Two Columbia professors have won prestigious Lasker Foundation Awards for their work in biological sciences.

Chemistry professor Virginia Cornish

Modern science is immensely complex, but Professor Virginia Cornish had a simple idea for solving a big problem.

Cell Polarity and Chirality: Human endothelial cells on a micropatterned ring (inner diameter: 250 mm, width: 200 mm) stained for actin (red), tubulin (green), and nuclei (blue). Cells form a ‘rightward’ chiral alignment, while polarized by positioning their centrosomes (bright green) rather than cell nuclei closer to each boundary.

A team of researchers led by Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic has developed a new technique to evaluate human stem cells using cell micropatte

Two Columbia professors have been named members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS).

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