Cancer

With the tap of a finger on a mobile app, people at risk of strokes and heart disease can use their phone as a remote ECG and transmit readings to medical providers miles away.

One of the world’s largest supercomputers in cancer research, based at CUMC, identified FOXM1 and CENPF as a synergistic driver pair in aggressive prostate cancer. Photo: Lynn Saville.

NEW YORK, NY (May 12, 2014) — Two genes work together to drive the most lethal forms of prostate cancer, according to new research from the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).

Mutated beta-catenin in bone cells may cause up to 40 percent of acute myeloid leukemia cases. In the cells of healthy subjects (left), beta catenin proteins (red dots) sit along the outer edges of the cell. In approximately 40 percent of AML patients (right), abnormal beta-catenin proteins (red dots) move into the cell interior; in mouse models, this movement sets cancer-causing changes into motion. Credit: Dr. Aruna Kode/Kousteni lab, Columbia University Medical Center.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a blood cancer, but for many patients the cancer may originate from an unusual source: a mutation in their bone cells.

Alfredo Axtmayer II will have a unique perspective to share with his patients when he becomes a nurse practitioner with a specialty in oncology. In 2008, when he was 27, he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma. It is now in remission.

“Global mapping of cancer gene expression changes to the human metabolic network; increased enzymatic expression across tumors is shown in red and decreased in blue,” said Dr. Vitkup (who provided the image).

A massive study analyzing gene expression data from 22 tumor types has identified multiple metabolic expression changes associated with cancer.

Columbia Engineering researchers, led by Dimitris Anastassiou, Charles Batchelor Professor in Electrical Engineering and member of the Columbia Initiative in Systems Biology, have developed a new computational model that is highly predictive of breast cancer survival.

A study by researchers at the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, recently e-published ahead of print by the "Journal of Clinical Oncology," suggests that women who have surgery for ovarian cancer at high-

Research at Columbia

Study finds lower rates of heart disease and cancer than for those living in more mixed areas

Figure 2: Abnormal accumulation of the FGFR-TACC fusion protein (red) in glioblastoma stem cells isolated from a primary human glioblastoma with fused FGFR- TACC genes. Cellular nuclei are colored blue. Image credit: Anna Lasorella and Antonio Iavarone/Columbia University Medical Center

Study Pinpoints a Genetic Cause of Most Lethal Brain Tumor— May Lead to New Treatment

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