Civil Rights

Martin Luther King Jr. in the Columbia Spectator
Image courtesy Columbia University Archives
On October 27, 1961, Martin Luther King Jr. addressed a group of students, faculty and members of the community at the McMillan Theatre (now the Miller Theatre) at the invitation of The Columbia Owl, a then-weekly publication of the School of General Studies.

Congressman John Lewis’ Life of Civil Rights Leadership Chronicled in Graphic Novels

Congressman John Lewis Civil Rights March Selma Comic Book
You might not think that civil rights and graphic novels go together, but Georgia Congressman John Lewis has turned to the popular literary form.

As chief of the Civil Rights Bureau at the New York Attorney General’s Office, Columbia Law School lecturer and alumna Kristen M. Clarke ’00 wields a host of state and federal laws to investigate and prosecute discrimination.

Columbia Law School Professor Suzanne B. Goldberg has more reason than most to be thrilled with the U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing gay marriage nationwide.

Protesters at Ferguson, MO. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

May 17 marks the 60th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education overruling the doctrine of “separate but equal” public education and finding that racially segregated public schools violate the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

May 17 marks the 60th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education overruling the doctrine of “separate but equal” public education and finding that racially segregated public schools violate the 14th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Thurgood Marshall’s NAACP legal team included Columbians Jack Greenberg and Constance Baker Motley here with Marshall. Courtesy of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Over 65 years as a crusading civil rights lawyer, Law School Professor Jack Greenberg (CC’45, LAW’48, CC Dean'89-93), argued the landmark case Brown v. Board of Education before the U.S. Supreme Court and won Martin Luther King Jr. the right to march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala.

In the decision by the federal judge who found New York City’s stop-and-frisk policies unconstitutional, one name appears more than any other: that of Jeffrey Fagan, a professor at Columbia Law School and the Mailman School of Public Health.