Climate

Wade McGillis has done research in the Caribbean off Puerto Rico and in watersheds in Haiti, but he always comes back to his laboratory in Piermont, N.Y., on the banks of the Hudson River.
 Peter deMenocal, oceanographer, Columbia professor of earth and environmental sciences

Peter deMenocal, founding director of The Center for Climate and Life. Photo by Eileen Barroso.

The Center for Climate and Life, a new research initiative based at Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, will focus on how climate change affects our access to such basic resources as food, water, shelter and energy.

El Niño NASA Image Rising Ocean Temperature

This NASA image shows the global rise of sea surface temperatures.

Massive fires in Indonesia. A typhoon in the Philippines. Forecasts of flooding in Kenya, drought in Brazil and torrential rains in bone-dry Southern California.

Atmospheric scientist Adam Sobel is author of the new book Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future.  A professor at Columbia University’s

By Lauren Ghelardini and Hayley Martinez

The U.S. corn belt and many other regions around the world may be at greater risk of drought by 2100 as warmer temperatures wring more moisture from the soil. (Cathy Haglund, Flickr)

Increasing heat is expected to extend dry conditions to far more farmland and cities by the end of the century than changes in rainfall alone, says a new study.

by Michael Shirber, for Astrobiology Magazine Wind and dust conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa can help predict a meningitis epidemic. Determining the role of climate in the spread of certain diseases can assist health officials in “forecasting” epidemics.

In something as tiny as a speck of dust lies the potential to change earth’s climate. When winds blow iron-rich dust off the continents, they give the plant-like algae floating on the surface of the oceans added nutrients to grow faster.

The R/V Polarstern during cruise ANTXXVI/2. Photo: Jürgen Gossler, Alfred-Wegener-Institut

In spring 2010, the research icebreaker Polarstern returned from the South Pacific with a scientific treasure—ocean sediments from a largely unexplored part of the vast, remote ocean that surrounds Antarctica—the Southern Ocean.

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