Commencement

Neil Duncan

Neil Duncan at the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro.

By the time Neil Duncan (BUS’17) entered Columbia Business School, he was already adept at grappling with—and surmounting—unexpected challenges.

Amir Imani

Amir Imani wrote his first computer program, a family phone book, at age 9. The experience sealed his interest in computing. “I always loved making and breaking things,” he said. “Coding gave me a way to explore the enigmatic world of computers.”

This is a moment of new beginnings both for Columbia, as the University opens the first two buildings on its new Manhattanville campus, and for the more than 15,000 members of the Class of 2017 who graduate on May 17.

A number of distinguished and noteworthy professionals are the featured speakers at more than 20 special events celebrating the Commencement exercises of Columbia University’s 263rd academic year. Events take place between Saturday, May 13, and Thursday, May 18.

Vikas Arun

Tap dancing and engineering may not seem like they have anything in common. But for graduating senior Vikas Arun, pairing these two passions makes plenty of sense.

Tyshawn Sorey

Tyshawn Sorey is a musician of many talents: improvisation, 20th-century avant-garde and classical music, rhythm and blues, metal, funk and hip hop, among other genres.

Jonny Cohen

By the time Jonathan (Jonny) Cohen started his freshman year at Columbia Engineering, he had launched a startup and been named—twice—to Forbes magazine’s “30 Under 30” list of energy sector leaders for his work in gree

Majed Abdulsamad

Photo by Chris Chiou

When Majed Abdulsamad earns his degree this month from Columbia’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, he will fulfill a lifelong plan—although not in Syria, where he grew up.

Richard Gamarra

When Richard Gamarra was 16, a gun fell out of his backpack during class at a Catholic high school in Queens and he was arrested.

The Double Discovery Center, a Columbia College program that works to foster college matriculation for low-income and first-generation middle and high school students in New York City, will be renamed The Roger Lehecka Double Discovery Center.

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