Commencement

Columbia Great Grad 2016 Bianca Howard

Photo by Roger Wong

Bianca Howard led a pioneering study on energy consumption in New York City that resulted in a popular interactive map aimed at giving urban planners, policy makers and engineers the information they need to find sustainable solutions for the city.
Columbia Great Grad 2016 Armando Torres-Garcia
Armando Tonatiuh Torres-Garcia got to the Journalism School after residents in his hometown of St. Helena, Calif., raised money for his tuition. An undocumented immigrant who came to the U.S. as a baby, he hopes to be an on-air reporter. “There are so many things happening worldwide that I want to get my hands on,” he says.
Dyan Summers Columbia University Grad 2016

Photo by Ryan Boran

When Dyan Summers’ patient suggested he might have a disease called “Zika Fever” in 2013, she was dubious. In her 15 years as a certified nurse practitioner specializing in tropical medicine, Summers had diagnosed malaria, Dengue fever and more.
Telegram Winston Churchill to Fackenthal Columbia University
In 1946, Columbia conferred an honorary degree on Winston Churchill, who had been prime minister of Great Britain when that nation was among the last holdouts to Nazi domination of Europe.
Ben Hoover Columbia University Grad 2016

Photo by Britt Olsen-Ecker

Ben Hoover was working as a neuroscience researcher in a Johns Hopkins lab, and weighing a career in medicine, when he realized he might be able to combine his fascination with the brain and passion for theater into a new way of telling stories.
Marcos Rocha Jr. Columbia University Grad 2016
Marcos Rocha, Jr., grew up in Spanish Harlem, but went halfway around the world with the Marines before he got to the University. It was during those tours of duty that Rocha saw the serious psychological issues faced by returning veterans.
Commencement 2015
Columbia University celebrates the Class of 2015.

Patrick Poorbaugh enlisted in the Marines during his senior year of high school and left for basic training soon after graduation. “We were in the middle of two wars, and I didn’t want to let others do the job,” he said. “And I knew I wasn’t ready for college.”

More than 30 years ago, biological sisters Lizzie Valverde (GS’15) and Katy Olson (GS’14) were adopted by different families. In the spring of 2013, they met by chance in a nonfiction seminar at Columbia’s School of General Studies.

Freshman orientation, 2011. Steven Bennett was playing cello in his dorm room on the 15th floor of John Jay Hall when he heard a knock on his door. When he opened it, another student with a broad grin exclaimed, “Cello!”

Pages