Data Science

An innovative digital art installation on the ground floor of the new Jerome L. Greene Science Center on Columbia’s Manhattanville campus invites visitors to peer inside the brain and meet the neuroscientists who are working upstairs to unravel its complexities.
galaxy radiates black hole

The massive black hole shown at left in this drawing is able to rapidly grow as intense radiation from a galaxy nearby shuts down star-formation in its host galaxy. Illustration Courtesy of John Wise, Georgia Tech

The appearance of supermassive black holes at the dawn of the universe has puzzled astronomers since their discovery more than a decade ago.

Hod Lipson artificial intelligence robots

Photo by Columbia Engineering

Mechanical Engineering Professor Hod Lipson’s latest book, Driverless: Intelligent Cars and the Road Ahead, coauthored with Melba Kurman, gained attention when it came out last fall for its prediction that these auto

Matthew Jones (left) and Chris Wiggins. Photo by John Pinderhughes

Matthew Jones (left) and Chris Wiggins. Photo by John Pinderhughes

The seminar in Fayerweather Hall required a new four-letter code in the directory of classes—HSAM—because it combines disciplines that are rarely taught in tandem, history and applied mathematics.

Habanero super computer Columbia University

Photo by Dali Plavsic

Deep in the subbasement of the Jerome L. Greene Science Center, the first building on Columbia’s new Manhattanville campus, there is enough computing power to perform 269 trillion mathematical calculations per second.

You Are Where You Go Quiz

Researchers at Columbia University's Data Science Institute built an online tool—You Are Where You Go—to let people audit their social media trail.

John Cunningham, Assistant Professor of Statistics

Photo by Michael DiVito

The quest to unravel the mysteries of the brain has made neuroscience one of today’s most exciting research fields.

As online privacy continues to decline, Professor Eben Moglen is taking matters into his own hands. With the development and production of what he calls the Freedom Box, Moglen hopes to forever change the way we use the Internet. In the process, he may also change the world.

Dennis Tenen, an assistant professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia, has an unusual background for a humanities scholar.

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