Data Science

Instagram selfie of study coauthor Ana-Andreea Stoica

A network effect known as homophily may reduce women’s visibility on social media when recommendation algorithms are added, says a new study. Above, a selfie from study coauthor Ana-Andreea Stoica's Instagram account. (Courtesy of Stoica)

When recommendation algorithms are turned loose on a social network with homophily, women become less visible, says a new study by Columbia researchers.
Yaniv Erlich holds a framed picture of his father as a teenager

Columbia computer scientist Yaniv Erlich has assembled the world's largest family tree to date. He and his father (pictured as a teenager) are among the 86 million genealogy profiles Erlich and his colleagues drew from in their study. (MyHeritage)

From 86 million genealogy profiles, researchers have amassed the largest, scientifically-vetted family tree to date, which at 13 million people, is slightly bigger than a nation the size of Cuba or Belgium. Published in the journal Science, the new dataset offers fresh insights into the last 500 years of marriage and migration in Europe and North America, and the role of genes in longevity.

Technology is changing journalism in ways no one could have imagined when Columbia Journalism School opened in 1912, and the algorithms, bots and trolls that affect how we get news today are just some of the complicating factors in the new information ecosystem.

New technology adapted to cheap DNA sequencers can rapidly identify people and cells from their DNA.

New technology adapted to cheap DNA sequencers can rapidly identify people and cells from their DNA. Here, researcher Sophie Zaaijer demonstrates from a NYC rooftop how easy DNA-authentication can be.

Researchers have developed a method to quickly and accurately identify people and cell lines from their DNA. The technology, described in the latest issue of eLife, has a wide range of applications, but its most immediate use could be to flag mislabeled or contaminated cell lines in cancer experiments.
In a new essay in Nature, Columbia neuroscientist Rafael Yuste joins more than two dozen researchers in calling for ethical guidelines to cover the evolving use of computer hardware and software to enhance or restore human capabilities.
In a study analyzing the genomes of 210,000 people in the United States and Britain, Columbia researchers find that the genetic variants linked to Alzheimer’s disease and heavy smoking are less frequent in people with longer lifespans, suggesting that natural selection is weeding out these unfavorable variants in both populations.

In this cover drawing for Cell Reports, Columbia researchers illustrate the concept that neurons fire in a consistent pattern during a seizure no matter how quickly the seizure spreads. The above string pattern stays the same regardless of whether both hands move closer or farther apart. (Michael Wenzel) 

Of the 50 million people who suffer from epilepsy worldwide, a third fail to respond to medication. As the search for better drugs continues, researchers are still trying to make sense of how seizures start and spread.

Amir Imani

Amir Imani wrote his first computer program, a family phone book, at age 9. The experience sealed his interest in computing. “I always loved making and breaking things,” he said. “Coding gave me a way to explore the enigmatic world of computers.”

Dr. Jeannette Wing
Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger today announced that Jeannette Wing, currently corporate vice president of Microsoft Research, will become the Avanessians Director of Columbia’s Data Science Institute and Professor of Computer Science.
An innovative digital art installation on the ground floor of the new Jerome L. Greene Science Center on Columbia’s Manhattanville campus invites visitors to peer inside the brain and meet the neuroscientists who are working upstairs to unravel its complexities.

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