Disease

Climate Change Columbia experts

Patrick Kinney and Madeleine Thomson

In 2009, The Lancet, one of the oldest and most prestigious medical journals in the world, declared climate change to be the greatest public health challenge of the 21st century. Seven years later, it still is.

Disease ecologist Maria Diuk-Wasser

Disease ecologist Maria Diuk-Wasser's (right) study looks at the connection between tick-borne pathogens.

As spring blooms, people in the Northeast and Midwest look forward to spending more time outdoors—which also means plotting ways to avoid the disease carrying black-legged deer tick. This year new research shows that people outside of these areas may also want to take precautions.

Serge E. Przedborski, MD, PhD, an internationally recognized clinician-scientist in the neurobiology of disease, has been appointed the inaugural director of the Columbia Translational Neuroscience Initiative (CTNI).

Colorized transmission electron micrograph of the Ebola virus virion. Credit: CDC/ Cynthia Goldsmith.

On Nov. 11, Dr. Craig Spencer, New York’s first and thus far only diagnosed case of Ebola, was released from Bellevue Hospital Center where his recovery was made possible by expert care.

Professor Daphna Shohamy, lead researcher. Photo by Eileen Barroso

Researchers at Columbia University and the University of Colorado at Boulder have found that expectations can drive changes in the brain, highlighting an important link between psychology and medicine.

Columbia campus

W. Ian Lipkin, MD, John Snow Professor of Epidemiology at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health and director of the school’s Center for Infection and Immunity, was named recipient of Villanova University’s 2014 Mendel Medal. Dr.

by Michael Shirber, for Astrobiology Magazine Wind and dust conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa can help predict a meningitis epidemic. Determining the role of climate in the spread of certain diseases can assist health officials in “forecasting” epidemics.

Countrywide Survey Finds Virus in Humans and Camels Match, Establishes That Direct Camel-to-Human Transmission Is Possible and Likely

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have identified a protein trafficking defect within brain cells that may underlie common non-familial forms of Parkinson’s disease.

Researchers in the Taub Institute at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have identified a mechanism that appears to underlie the common sporadic (non-familial) form of Parkinson’s disease, the progressive movement disorder.

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