Earth Institute

The magma that feeds volcanoes beneath Earth’s surface is a mix of solid particles, liquid melt and gas bubbles. Successfully predicting whether lava from an erupting volcano will ooze out slowly or in a sudden and potentially deadly explosion has long vexed scientists.

black and white photo of two native american women

"Norma" told photographer Daniel Jack Lyons, "In the street there has been a lot of crime that has happened to us. Once my daughter and I went out and three boys attacked us, so one feels panic, fear because you think you are safe but you don't know what may happen to you in the street."

Stark, black-and-white photographs by Daniel Jack Lyons (MPH’12) are on view in Low Library’s rotunda in an exhibition entitled Speaking to Peace: Portraits from Maputo and New York City that ca

Alex Halliday

Photo Courtesy of Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences Division, Oxford University

“Alex Halliday is a renowned research scientist and skillful academic leader who is uniquely suited to charting the Institute’s future and its vital interdisciplinary role at the University," said President Lee C. Bollinger.
Climate Change NASA Glacier Melting Columbia University

The image above depicts the effects climate change has had on Alaska's Muir Glacier. The photo on the left was taken on Aug 13, 1941 by William O. Field. The photo on the right was taken by Bruce F. Molnia on Aug 31, 2004.

Some 40 years ago a Columbia professor coined the phrase “global warming.” Wallace Broecker (CC’53, GSAS’58), the Newberry Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, published an article titled "Climatic Change: Are We on t

The U.S. corn belt and many other regions around the world may be at greater risk of drought by 2100 as warmer temperatures wring more moisture from the soil. (Cathy Haglund, Flickr)

Increasing heat is expected to extend dry conditions to far more farmland and cities by the end of the century than changes in rainfall alone, says a new study.

The Columbia Water Center, part of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, announced today the release of a new white paper, “Assessment of Groundwater Level Trends across the United States,” that analyzes long-term groundwater trends across the United States.

Eight hundred years ago, relatively small armies of mounted warriors suddenly exploded outward from the cold, arid high-elevation grasslands of Mongolia, and conquered the largest contiguous empire in history.

The R/V Polarstern during cruise ANTXXVI/2. Photo: Jürgen Gossler, Alfred-Wegener-Institut

In spring 2010, the research icebreaker Polarstern returned from the South Pacific with a scientific treasure—ocean sediments from a largely unexplored part of the vast, remote ocean that surrounds Antarctica—the Southern Ocean.

Pages