Earth Institute

Climate Change NASA Glacier Melting Columbia University

The image above depicts the effects climate change has had on Alaska's Muir Glacier. The photo on the left was taken on Aug 13, 1941 by William O. Field. The photo on the right was taken by Bruce F. Molnia on Aug 31, 2004.

Some 40 years ago a Columbia professor coined the phrase “global warming.” Wallace Broecker (CC’53, GSAS’58), the Newberry Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, published an article titled "Climatic Change: Are We on t

The U.S. corn belt and many other regions around the world may be at greater risk of drought by 2100 as warmer temperatures wring more moisture from the soil. (Cathy Haglund, Flickr)

Increasing heat is expected to extend dry conditions to far more farmland and cities by the end of the century than changes in rainfall alone, says a new study.

The Columbia Water Center, part of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, announced today the release of a new white paper, “Assessment of Groundwater Level Trends across the United States,” that analyzes long-term groundwater trends across the United States.

Eight hundred years ago, relatively small armies of mounted warriors suddenly exploded outward from the cold, arid high-elevation grasslands of Mongolia, and conquered the largest contiguous empire in history.

The R/V Polarstern during cruise ANTXXVI/2. Photo: Jürgen Gossler, Alfred-Wegener-Institut

In spring 2010, the research icebreaker Polarstern returned from the South Pacific with a scientific treasure—ocean sediments from a largely unexplored part of the vast, remote ocean that surrounds Antarctica—the Southern Ocean.

Earth Institute Director Jeffrey Sachs will launch a free, global, online course this month, called “The Age of Sustainable Development.” The course aims to spread to an international audience a broader understanding of the need for economic development that is socially inclusive and also

From providing expertise on the risks of rising seas to New York’s coastline to shedding light on the mysteries of the universe, Columbians bring hands-on experience to the ways we understand the Earth and space.

A huge 2010 Chile earthquake (pictured here) set off lesser tremors near waste-injection sites in central Oklahoma and southern Colorado, says a new study. (Claudio Núñez)

Large earthquakes from distant parts of the globe are setting off tremors around waste-fluid injection wells in the central United States, says a new study.

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