Earth Institute

Earth Institute Director Jeffrey Sachs will launch a free, global, online course this month, called “The Age of Sustainable Development.” The course aims to spread to an international audience a broader understanding of the need for economic development that is socially inclusive and also

From providing expertise on the risks of rising seas to New York’s coastline to shedding light on the mysteries of the universe, Columbians bring hands-on experience to the ways we understand the Earth and space.

A huge 2010 Chile earthquake (pictured here) set off lesser tremors near waste-injection sites in central Oklahoma and southern Colorado, says a new study. (Claudio Núñez)

Large earthquakes from distant parts of the globe are setting off tremors around waste-fluid injection wells in the central United States, says a new study.

When scientists talk about climate change, they usually mean significant changes in the measures of climate over several decades or longer. Climate variability generally refers to seasonal changes over a year or so.

During Europe’s 2003 heat wave, July temperatures in France were as much as 18 degrees F hotter than in 2001. (NASA)

Fueled by industrial greenhouse gas emissions, Earth’s climate warmed more between 1971 and 2000 than during any other three-decade interval in the last 1,400 years, according to new regional temperature reconstructions covering all seven continents.

The Jan. 14 launch event featured panel discussions on the impacts of media on democracy and sustainable development in the region.

Columbia and Columbians have long been working across many regions in Africa, from the Mailman School’s leadership of AIDS/HIV programs and the Earth Institute’s research on sustainable development to the many scholars of African history and politics, culture and society.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration officially designated 2012 as the warmest year on record for the contiguous United States. This isn't too surprising for a year that already had the warmest spring, the second warmest summer and fourth warmest winter.

Daniel Hillel reviews "Handbook of Climate Change and Agroecosystems," which he co-edited with Cynthia Rosenzweig Image credit: Kevin Krajick

Born during the Great Depression, Daniel Hillel moved to Palestine as a child and settled with his family on a kibbutz, where he learned firsthand the difficulty of rehabilitating degraded land.

Daniel Hillel

Daniel Hillel, an adjunct senior scientist at Columbia University’s Earth Institute, has been awarded the World Food Prize for his work in conceiving and promoting water-saving methods that have increased crop production on arid lands in 30 countries.

Eliminating leaks from energy-producing facilities would remove large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane from the air. Here, natural gas explodes from a pipe in Middletown, Conn., January 2010
(U.S. Chemical Safety Board)

Reducing Soot and Methane Would Bring Fast Results, Says Study

Pages