Economics

Columbia University campus on a bright sunny day and the New York City skyline off in the distance.

Photo by Eileen Barroso

As Columbia University opens the first buildings on its new Manhattanville campus, universities have become an increasingly vital source of both middle-income jobs for New Yorkers and new scientific discoveries that power the city’s growing innovation economy.

An African American woman in 1943 with a red bandana on her head uses a hand drill to add screws to a metal sheet.

“Operating a hand drill at Vultee-Nashville, a woman is working on a ‘Vengeance’ dive bomber,” Nashville, Tennessee, 1943.

One of the founders of the field of women’s history, Alice Kessler-Harris earned her Ph.D. in the late 1960s and then realized that history books had omitted the entire gender from their pages.

Geoffrey Heal

Photo by Eileen Barroso

Geoffrey Heal studied physics and economics as an undergraduate, but has always cared deeply about the environment. “I’ve been interested in nature all my life,” he says.

Sharyn O'Halloran Economist

Sharyn O’Halloran, the George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economics and Professor of International and Public Affairs, has been focusing on the role of money in p

Thomas Trebat, an economist and political analyst, is director of the Columbia Global Centers, Rio de Janeiro. A former Latin America analyst on Wall Street, he now travels extensively in Brazil to build the University’s connections with partner institutions in government and academia.

Jan Svejnar, professor of global political economy

Photo by Bruce Gilbert

Jan Svejnar discusses the fallout from Britain's vote to withdraw from the European Union.
As chair of the Economics Department, Donald Davis teaches classes on international economics, globalization and trade. But his undergraduate students can, in effect, get a tour of the discipline’s major theories as they are practiced in the real world.
Jan Svejnar Political Economy Columbia University

Photo by Bruce Gilbert

Jan Svejnar was born in Czechoslovakia when it was still in the grip of a totalitarian Communist regime. Certain things worked well, such as rebuilding the country from the devastation of World War II, yet there was very little freedom.
Marcos Troyjo Brazil Economy Columbia University
At the turn of the century, an economist coined the acronym BRIC to refer to the rising fortunes of the developing nations Brazil, Russia, India and China. At that time, Brazil’s nominal GDP expanded to qualify the Latin American country as one...
Race Economics Dan O'Flaherty Columbia University

Brendan O’Flaherty was a teenager in Newark, N.J. in the 1960s, when the city was engulfed by racially charged political battles and violence.

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