Election 2016

Election 2016
The 2016 presidential campaign is being fought amid one of the most contentious periods in recent American political history. It’s a time of deepening party polarization, rising concerns about systemic racism, an ongoing backlash against globalization and partisan efforts to impose voter ID laws.
Jeff Lax
The election of Donald Trump and a Republican majority in the Senate likely means a conservative majority will dominate the U.S. Supreme Court for decades.

Columbia faculty experts are available to comment on the 2016 election, campaigning, polling, party politics, voter behavior and more. Contact: Eric Sharfstein, Columbia University, (212) 854-6164, es3106@columbia.edu.

Andrew Gelman

With the presidential election just two weeks away, the latest polls suggest that Hillary Clinton will win, some saying her chances are better than 90 percent. But individual poll results vary widely and some still give Trump a chance of turning things around.

Rodolfo de la Garza
Who will turn out to vote on November 8? Rodolfo de la Garza, Eaton Professor of Administrative Law and Municipal Science and Professor of International and Public Affairs, has insight into a key block of voters: Latinos.
Richard Briffault Law School

The last seven years have seen a slew of state laws enacted that require voters to have government-issued identification to combat in-person voter fraud.  That, in turn, has set up a series of challenges to those laws, many of which have been scaled back or overturned by federal courts.

Sharyn O'Halloran Economist

Sharyn O’Halloran, the George Blumenthal Professor of Political Economics and Professor of International and Public Affairs, has been focusing on the role of money in p

Gregory Wawro Political Science Professor

Gregory Wawro specializes in explaining the intricacies of politics and government. As a professor of political science, he studies Congress, campaign finance, political economy and judicial politics.

Michael Graetz Tax Expert
Politicians have been talking about the need for tax reform for decades and this year’s presidential campaign is no exception. Hillary Clinton and Donald J. Trump both say changes are needed, but it should come as no surprise that their proposals are very different.

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