Engineering

For nearly half a century, Gary Johnson, an instrument maker at Columbia University Medical Center, has been taking scientists’ ideas for research equipment and turning them into reality.

An electronic chip, based on nanometer scale pores, designed to study the properties of single biomolecules.

In 1754 the original King’s College charter declared one of its missions to be teaching “everything useful for the comfort, the convenience and elegance of life.” It’s a goal that seems especially noteworthy as the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science celebrates its sesq

In a study published today in Nature Communications, a research team led by Ken Shepard, professor of electrical engineering and biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, and Lars Dietrich, assistant professor of biological sciences at Columbia University, has demonstrated that integ

Chris Wiggins, associate professor of applied mathematics, has just been appointed to an exciting new role at "The New York Times:" chief data scientist.

Cortical responses to speech sounds
—Image courtesy of UCSF

Nima Mesgarani, assistant professor of electrical engineering, is the lead author of a new study on how speech sounds are identified by the human brain, offering an unprecedented insight into the basis of human language.

In recent years, human interactions with intelligent machines and software have become increasingly commonplace.

Patricia Culligan, professor of civil engineering and engineering mechanics, is leading a team of 20 investigators who have just won a five-year $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study how urban green infrastructure (GI) can mitigate the city's role in coa

A team of Columbia Engineering researchers, led by Mechanical Engineering Professor James Hone and Electrical Engineering Professor Kenneth Shepard, has taken advantage of graphene’s special properties—its mechanical strength and electrical conduction—and created a nano-mechanical system t

When astronauts go on a mission, they are allowed to take one or two personal items with them. On his first space flight in 2002, Michael Massimino (ENG’84) took a Columbia Engineering School flag.

(Editor's note: This story was originally published on November 4, 2009. Shree Nayar's Bigshot digital camera is now available and the video has been updated.)

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