Engineering

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger today announced his appointment of Mary Cunningham Boyce as the new Dean of the Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, effective July 1, 2013.

Investor at Neu Venture Capital and IEOR Adjunct Assistant Professor Jerry Neumann BS’88, MS’90, seen here teaching a class in entrepreneurship, is on the teaching team for I-Corps NYCRIN. —Photos by Jeff Ballinger

After a comprehensive review of the nation’s top universities and research institutions, the National Science Foundation has awarded $3.74 million to Columbia University, City University of New York, and New York University for a three-year research-to-startup initiative.

A new study by Columbia Engineering researchers finds that the infant brain does not control its blood flow in the same way as the adult brain.

Researchers at Columbia Engineering and Georgia Institute of Technology have published a study in the February 4 online Early Edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) showing—for the first time—that certain volatile organic gases can promote cloud formatio

Klaus Lackner’s approach to slowing global warming is to clean up the atmosphere—literally.

An image of a nanoscale chip engineered by Peter Kinget's lab. He is attempting to build self-powered sensors that run on tiny bits of ambient solar energy, using so little power that their batteries never need replacing.

It’s relatively simple to build a device capable of detecting wireless signals if you don’t mind making one that consumes lots of power. It’s not so easy to design energy-efficient devices that function as well as the components they replace, or to do it at the nano scale.

Jim Yardley

Jim Yardley has seen firsthand how the nanotechnology field has exploded over the past decade. “It’s extremely exciting,” says the managing director of Columbia’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center.

An electronic chip based on nanometer scale pores designed to study the properties of single biomolecules Image credit: Jacob Rosenstein and Prof. Kenneth Shepard

The word “nanos” is Greek for dwarf, and over time “nano” has come to refer to anything small, like the iPod nano. In science, however, it has a very precise definition: 10-9, or a billionth.

A digital microarray from the lab of Ken Shepard, a professor of electrical engineering, can measure individual DNA molecules, which are shown in this image. The new technology dramatically improves and simplifies genetic analysis.

Ken Shepard, a professor of electrical engineering, believes there is nowhere else in the world where he could do what he does. “Imagine a convergence of semiconductor technology and biotechnology. There is no company out there that has expertise in both,” he says.

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