Environment

Geoffrey Heal

Photo by Eileen Barroso

Geoffrey Heal studied physics and economics as an undergraduate, but has always cared deeply about the environment. “I’ve been interested in nature all my life,” he says.

Hybrid Organic Inorganic Perovskites solar cells graphic

A new class of solar cells. Graphic by Nicoletta Barolini.

In a discovery that could have profound implications for future energy policy, Columbia scientists have demonstrated it is possible to manufacture solar cells that are far more efficient than existing silicon energy cells by using a new kind of material, a development that could help reduc

Columbia University VP of Environmental Stewardship Jessica Prata

Photo by John Pinderhughes

Jessica Prata, assistant vice president of Environmental Stewardship in Facilities and Operations, collaborates with departments across Columbia to help reduce the University’s impact on the environment
Columbia Great Grad 2016 Mounir Enenbach
Mounir Ennenbach has been fascinated by weather since he was 12 years old, when an aunt gave him the rain gauge he used to create a small weather station in front of his home in Amman, Jordan. Now a student of earth and environmental engineering.
Columbia Great Grad 2016 Bianca Howard

Photo by Roger Wong

Bianca Howard led a pioneering study on energy consumption in New York City that resulted in a popular interactive map aimed at giving urban planners, policy makers and engineers the information they need to find sustainable solutions for the city.

On mornings in July, a group of very large and fit Columbia students arrived on West 205th Street to spend their first days in New York with preschoolers.

By Lauren Ghelardini and Hayley Martinez

Making a green graduation gown.

When students assemble this year for Commencement, their gowns will look blue but half of them will be green, thanks to material made from recycled plastic bottles.

Research at Columbia

A study by Columbia researchers has found that children from three school districts in Maine exposed to arsenic in drinking water experienced declines in intelligence.

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