Epidemiology

Dr. Stephen S. Morse is a professor of epidemiology at Columbia University Medical Center and an expert in global and public health. He cooperates with scientists world wide on research and the development of early warning and response systems for the prevention of infectious diseases.

Dyan Summers Columbia University Grad 2016

Photo by Ryan Boran

When Dyan Summers’ patient suggested he might have a disease called “Zika Fever” in 2013, she was dubious. In her 15 years as a certified nurse practitioner specializing in tropical medicine, Summers had diagnosed malaria, Dengue fever and more.
Colorized transmission electron micrograph of the Ebola virus virion. Credit: CDC/ Cynthia Goldsmith.

On Nov. 11, Dr. Craig Spencer, New York’s first and thus far only diagnosed case of Ebola, was released from Bellevue Hospital Center where his recovery was made possible by expert care.

Ursula M. Staudinger Appointed Director of New Center Named for Robert N. Butler

You probably think you know how to wash your hands, but Elaine Larson could tell you for sure.

Research at Columbia

Obesity kills, giving rise to a host of fatal diseases. This much is well known. But when it comes to seniors, a slew of prominent research has reported an “obesity paradox” that says, at age 65 and older, having an elevated BMI won’t shorten your lifespan, and may even extend it.

New computer model takes a page from weather forecasting to predict regional peaks in influenza outbreaks

Research at Columbia

Study finds lower rates of heart disease and cancer than for those living in more mixed areas

Overall, 17% of children in the United States are obese, and in inner-city neighborhoods, the prevalence is as high as 25%. While poor diets and physical inactivity are the main culprits, there is new evidence that air pollution can play a role.

Worldwide pandemics of influenza caused widespread death and illness in 1918, 1957, 1968, and 2009. A new study examining weather patterns around the time of these pandemics finds that each of them was preceded by La Niña conditions in the equatorial Pacific.

Pages