On Exhibit

Propaganda for Lenin during the Russian Revolution

"Our Lenin" illustrated by William Siegel. Image Courtesy of the Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The Rare Book and Manuscript Library is marking the centennial with an exhibition intended to both convey the dramatic events of 1917 and to show their continued relevance.
archival image from Frank Lloyd Wright

Frank Lloyd Wright and Taliesin Fellows, Broadacre City model, 1935; The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives. Image Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art | Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library

This fall the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery brings together two very different mid-20th century visions for housing in the U.S. with its exhibition, Living in America: Frank Lloyd Wright, Harlem and Modern Housing.

Portrait of Florine Stettheimer

Florine Stettheimer, photograph by Peter A. Juley & Son, c. 1917-20. Image provided by Peter A. Juley & Son Collection, Photograph Archives, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. 

Florine Stettheimer, a renowned New York City-based painter, designer and poet, was a woman ahead of her time. Now, the Jewish Museum in New York City is telling her story in an exhibition, "Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry."
Joanne's Girls by Douglas Miles

A photograph in the Apache Chronicles exhibit titled Joanne's Girls by Douglas Miles.

Douglas Miles is a Native American artist whose paintings and other works reference Apache motifs. In the 1990s, after watching his son skateboarding, he decided to make a board for him.
Harper's Weekly Joseph Pulitzer Cartoon
When Gwendolyn Brooks won a Pulitzer for "Annie Allen," she became the first African American to win. When Sinclair Lewis won for "Arrowsmith," he refused it—the only time that has happened. These are just a few of the anecdotes shared in a new exhibition.
Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library’s American Viewbooks Collection provides pictorial documentation of the growth of cities and towns across the United States from the mid-19th century to the early 20th century.
On the south side of West 125th Street stands a four-story, century-old building whose façade is sheathed in milky white terracotta. When it was built in 1909, at the same time that the Morningside Heights campus, it was a state-of-the-art bottling plant for Sheffield Farms.
Works by some of the major artists of the past 50 years are on view in the exhibition Open This End: Contemporary Art from the Collection of Blake Byrne at the Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery.
NYC's Main Post Office 1901-1939

New York City’s main post office, completed in 1901, was torn down in 1939 to make way for an extension of City Hall.

When Andrew Dolkart was a student at Colgate University in the early 1970s, he was an avid reader of Ada Louise Huxtable’s architecture columns in The New York Times.

Thomas Merton manuscript in the outline of an angel

Thomas Merton's papers are now on display at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library.  

Thomas Merton (CC’38, MA’39) was a monk, mystic, best-selling author, poet, civil rights activist and photographer. These facets of his life and more are on display at the Rare Book and Manuscript Library in a show that celebrates the centennial of his birth and showcases Columbia’s collection of his papers and photographs.

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