Faculty Q&A

Photo by Eileen Barroso

As a Business School professor who has won awards for teaching excellence, Daniel Ames doesn’t seem like someone associated with mind reading.

Mae Ngai

Mae Ngai’s interest in the history of immigration and labor began when she was a high school student in the 1960s.

James Shapiro is among the best known Shakespeare scholars in the world. His award-winning books include Shakespeare and the Jews (1995), A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare: 1599 (2005) and Contested Will: Who Wrote Shakespeare? (2010).

Dennis Tenen, an assistant professor of English and comparative literature at Columbia, has an unusual background for a humanities scholar.

Pamela Smith speaks at the University Lecture. Photo by Eileen Barroso

History professor Pamela Smith started college thinking she would be a chemist.

As a scientist, Sean Solomon has studied Mercury, Venus and Mars. Now he heads Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, whose researchers study planet Earth, from its deepest ocean to its highest peak.

When Farah Griffin asked her mother what she remembered about World War II, her response was, “All the handsome soldiers who drove the buses in Philadelphia.” Griffin, the William B.

Mark Hansen in the space that will house the David and Helen Gurley Brown Institute for Media Innovation.

Statistician. Technologist. Artistic collaborator. And now, journalism professor.

As a recent medical school graduate of Cairo University, Wafaa El-Sadr arrived in the U.S.

When he received his A.B. from Harvard in 1969, Martin Chalfie wasn’t sure what he would do next. His worst grades had been in physics and chemistry, and a summer research project had failed, so science seemed out of reach.

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