Freedom of Speech

Editor's Note: President Lee C. Bollinger delivered this address to incoming first-year undergraduates and their families on Monday, August 29, 2016.

Michael Schudson Columbia University
The right to know is so ubiquitous today that it’s hard to imagine a time when citizens, consumers and patients had no access to information we now consider basic.

Columbia awarded its first Global Freedom of Expression Prizes to courts in Turkey and Zimbabwe and to a U.K.-based legal services organization in recognition of their contributions to free speech and a free press.

Columbia University’s inaugural Global Freedom of Expression Prizes were awarded on March 11 to the Constitutional Court of Turkey, the Constitutional Court of Zimbabwe and the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI).

Columbia University’s inaugural Global Freedom of Expression Prizes were awarded on March 11 to the Constitutional Court of Turkey, the Constitutional Court of Zimbabwe and the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI). The awards, established earlier this year by University President Lee C.

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger reflects on the inaugural Global Freedom of Expression Prizes, which recognize the best judicial decisions and legal representation around the world in advancing international legal norms and principles of freedom of expression.

As our university has made clear from the outset of this recent story, we are deeply concerned about any government activity that would chill the freedom of thought or intrude upon student privacy, both of which are so essential to our academic community.