Global

Columbia awarded its first Global Freedom of Expression Prizes to courts in Turkey and Zimbabwe and to a U.K.-based legal services organization in recognition of their contributions to free speech and a free press.

Columbia University’s inaugural Global Freedom of Expression Prizes were awarded on March 11 to the Constitutional Court of Turkey, the Constitutional Court of Zimbabwe and the Media Legal Defence Initiative (MLDI).

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger reflects on the inaugural Global Freedom of Expression Prizes, which recognize the best judicial decisions and legal representation around the world in advancing international legal norms and principles of freedom of expression.

Jason Bordoff. Photo by Eileen Barroso.

Jason Bordoff, a former member of the White House staff and a top energy policy expert, started learning about the industry at an early age.

Tunisian electors waiting to vote in the October 2014 elections. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

Alfred Stepan has been called the democracy whisperer. As the Wallace Sayre Professor of Government, he’s been watching, advising and studying government and democracy for over 40 years.

Atik Ali Pasha Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey. Interior, central dome. Photo by Gabriel Rodriguez, Media Center for Art History, Department of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University

When Zainab Bahrani traveled to Iraq 10 years ago, she realized that it was crucial to document the extensive damage to the country’s cultural treasures caused by years of war.

Last November, after Ukraine’s President Viktor Yanukovych postponed preparations to sign the Ukraine-European Union Association Agreement, a wave of antigovernment protests and civil unrest overtook Ukraine, resulting in the ouster of Yanukovych and a confrontation between Russia and Ukra

Andrew Nathan, Class of 1919 Professor of Political Science, is an expert on Chinese politics and foreign policy, even though he hasn’t been to the country since 2001.

For months the crisis in Ukraine has left the media scrambling to explain newsworthy developments that seem to unfold on a daily if not hourly basis. What to make of Russia’s annexation of Crimea in March? How to explain Russian President Vladimir Putin’s motives?

by Michael Shirber, for Astrobiology Magazine Wind and dust conditions in Sub-Saharan Africa can help predict a meningitis epidemic. Determining the role of climate in the spread of certain diseases can assist health officials in “forecasting” epidemics.

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