History

Tongan cultural artifacts

Among the items in the new exhibit case are a feathered belt, bowl and headdress that are representative of Tongan culture. The bowl is sitting on a decorated Fijian masi, a barkcloth that is used in furnishings and clothing. Photo by AMNH/D. Finnin

The American Museum of Natural History and Columbia’s Museum Anthropology graduate program have collaborated for the first time on an exhibit case researched and designed by the students.
Natasha Lightfoot

The personal and the professional came together for Natasha Lightfoot in her first book, Troubling Freedom: Antigua and the Aftermath of British Emancipation.

When Henry Moore’s bronze Reclining Figure was installed in front of Havemeyer Hall on December 14, Columbia became the second university in the United States, after MIT, to have two Moore sculptures on permanent display.

John Reddick

Photo courtesy of Apollo Theater Education Program

John Reddick is one of 18 northern Manhattan residents selected by the University to pursue research projects and develop their skills at Columbia.
National Museum of African American History & Culture

National Museum of African American History & Culture - Photo by Alan Karchmer/NMAAHC

To write the book about the new National Museum of African American History and Culture, Mabel O.

W. Somerset Maugham
W. Somerset Maugham, whose well-known works include Of Human Bondage, The Moon and Sixpence and The Razor’s Edge, visited Columbia in November 1950 at the invitation of philosophy professor Irwin Edman (CC'1917, Ph.D.’20), a longtime friend.
Karl Jacoby Borderland History Columbia Professor
The unusual life story is told in a new book titled "The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire" by Karl Jacoby, a professor in the history department and the Center for Study of Ethnicity and Race. Ellis “learned how to be what people wanted him to be, and how to be sure that people would see what they want to see."
Lin-Manuel Miranda Receives Kennedy Prize, Views Hamilton Archive
A selection of items from the Rare Book and Manuscript Library's Alexander Hamilton archive is now on view. It includes papers, letters and personal items that figure prominently in the award-winning show.
For the better part of four decades, the Supreme Court discussion about affirmative action, as it occurs in legal briefs, oral arguments and opinions, has been of one narrow stripe: the Court typically considers whether a white student has been harmed...
Lin-Manuel Miranda Receives Kennedy Prize, Views Hamilton Archive

Lin-Manuel Miranda, creator of the Broadway musical Hamilton views artifacts of Alexander Hamilton's life from Columbia Libraries' Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Photo by Eileen Barroso

Lin-Manuel Miranda, the composer, lyricist, writer and star of the hit Broadway musical "Hamilton," came to Columbia April 7 to receive the Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History.

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