Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Columbia climatologist Maureen Raymo is trying to predict the planet’s future by looking to its past.

As a scientist, Sean Solomon has studied Mercury, Venus and Mars. Now he heads Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, whose researchers study planet Earth, from its deepest ocean to its highest peak.

A huge 2010 Chile earthquake (pictured here) set off lesser tremors near waste-injection sites in central Oklahoma and southern Colorado, says a new study. (Claudio Núñez)

Large earthquakes from distant parts of the globe are setting off tremors around waste-fluid injection wells in the central United States, says a new study.

Mark Cane, an expert on the El Niño climate pattern, and Terry Plank, an authority on explosive volcanoes—both scientists at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory--have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences.

The Lamont-Doherty Core Repository holds one of the world’s most unique and important collections of scientific samples from the deep sea—approximately 72,000 meters of sediment cores from every major ocean and sea.

During Europe’s 2003 heat wave, July temperatures in France were as much as 18 degrees F hotter than in 2001. (NASA)

Fueled by industrial greenhouse gas emissions, Earth’s climate warmed more between 1971 and 2000 than during any other three-decade interval in the last 1,400 years, according to new regional temperature reconstructions covering all seven continents.

A 2011 magnitude 5.7 quake near Prague, Okla., apparently triggered by wastewater injection, buckled U.S. Highway 62. (John Leeman)

A new study in the journal Geology is the latest to tie a string of unusual earthquakes, in this case, in central Oklahoma, to the injection of wastewater deep underground. Researchers now say that the magnitude 5.7 earthquake near Prague, Okla., on Nov.

In suburban Clifton, New Jersey, a massive basalt flow (black rock, left) from the time of the End Triassic Extinction lies exposed in a former rock quarry, now behind a retirement home. A thin layer of sedimentary rock mostly covered in debris, at far right, records the sudden disappearance of many creatures. CLICK TO SEE VIDEO OF DRILLING IN NEW JERSEY. (Paul Olsen/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

Scientists examining evidence across the world from New Jersey to North Africa say they have linked the abrupt disappearance of half of earth’s species 200 million years ago to a precisely dated set of gigantic volcanic eruptions.

Solomon led efforts to identify the cause of the ozone hole over Antarctica.

An American atmospheric chemist who led efforts to identify the cause of the Antarctic ozone hole and a French geochemist who extracted the longest-yet climate record from polar ice cores have won the prestigious 2012 Vetlesen Prize.

Pages