Law

Tim Wu, the Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law, is perhaps best known for coining the term “net neutrality,” the idea that internet service providers should treat all data equally and not block, speed up or slow down traffic based on their own agenda.

Gillian Metzger smiling

Photo Courtesy of Columbia Law School

The U.S. Supreme Court begins its new term with a full complement of nine justices and what is "shaping up to be a big case term,” said Gillian Metzger.
Carol Sanger standing behind a podium and in front of a chalkboard.

Carol Sanger started writing About Abortion: Terminating Pregnancy in Twenty-First-Century America (Harvard University Press) shortly after Barack Obama (CC’83) won the 2008 presidential election.

United States Capitol Building
All eyes were on Washington as former FBI Director James Comey testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee on June 8.
Chief Justice Robert Yazzi, Shawn Watts

Chief Justice Emeritus Robert Yazzi, Navajo Nation (seated at center), shares a story. Shawn Watts is to the right. Photo by Tamara Willliams\UNM School of Law

As a lecturer in law at Columbia Law School and associate director of the mediation program, Shawn Watts (Law’12) is well-versed in dispute-resolution techniques.

Columbia and its peers filed an amicus brief today challenging the President's executive order. It says that “safety and security concerns can be addressed…consistent with the values America has always stood for, including…the welcoming of immigrants to our universities.”
Columbia News followed up with David Pozen, a noted scholar of constitutional law at Columbia Law School, on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals' consideration whether to extend a temporary stay of the travel ban.

President Lee C. Bollinger joined 47 leaders at colleges and universities across the U.S. in a letter urging President Trump to "rectify or rescind" his executive order on immigration. Following is the text of the letter:

Jeff Lax
The election of Donald Trump and a Republican majority in the Senate likely means a conservative majority will dominate the U.S. Supreme Court for decades.

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