Neuroscience

Nikolaus Kriegeskorte at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute organized a three-day conference that starts brings together cognitive scientists, neuroscientists and computer scientists. Kriegeskorte spoke with us about the event and his research.
Charles Zuker in his office.
Neuroscientist Charles Zuker has helped identify the cells, receptors and signaling mechanisms that govern what we taste.
Ellen Lumpkin sits in her laboratory.

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Touch may be the hardest of the senses to study, because the skin has so many jobs to do. It parses hot from cold, contends with itches, detects pain and more.
Ken Shepard
Ken Shepard is part of a growing push to develop brain-computer interfaces to repair senses and skills lost to injury or disease.
Stavros Lomvardas
Stavros Lomvardas has studied smell to the molecular level, uncovering how the nose knows different scents.
Malia Mason with short blonde hair resting her right arm on a rail, wearing an outfit by MM LaFleur.

Photo by Frances F. Denny for MM. LaFleur

Malia Mason studies how people regulate their attention—or don’t—and what implications that may have for students, managers and employees.
Frances Champagne smiling, with short brown hair, and a purple shirt.

Forget nature vs. nurture. Scientists now know that maternal behavior can change offspring in ways that may be passed on to future generations.

In this cover drawing for Cell Reports, Columbia researchers illustrate the concept that neurons fire in a consistent pattern during a seizure no matter how quickly the seizure spreads. The above string pattern stays the same regardless of whether both hands move closer or farther apart. (Michael Wenzel) 

Of the 50 million people who suffer from epilepsy worldwide, a third fail to respond to medication. As the search for better drugs continues, researchers are still trying to make sense of how seizures start and spread.

Researchers at Columbia University have discovered that a small group of neurons fired haphazardly in mice with signs of schizophrenia. The findings suggest that a breakdown in the synchronized behavior of these brain cells could produce the classic disordered thinking and perceptions associated with the disease.
Rudy Behnia

Photo by John Abbott

To understand the workings of an enormously complex brain, it’s sometimes best to look at a simpler one. Rudy Behnia, whose research centers on vision, studies fruit flies for just that reason.

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