Neuroscience

In this cover drawing for Cell Reports, Columbia researchers illustrate the concept that neurons fire in a consistent pattern during a seizure no matter how quickly the seizure spreads. The above string pattern stays the same regardless of whether both hands move closer or farther apart. (Michael Wenzel) 

Of the 50 million people who suffer from epilepsy worldwide, a third fail to respond to medication. As the search for better drugs continues, researchers are still trying to make sense of how seizures start and spread.

Researchers at Columbia University have discovered that a small group of neurons fired haphazardly in mice with signs of schizophrenia. The findings suggest that a breakdown in the synchronized behavior of these brain cells could produce the classic disordered thinking and perceptions associated with the disease.
Rudy Behnia

Photo by John Abbott

To understand the workings of an enormously complex brain, it’s sometimes best to look at a simpler one. Rudy Behnia, whose research centers on vision, studies fruit flies for just that reason.

Chidinma Paige Manhattanville

Photo by Eileen Barroso

Chidinma Paige manages and develops interactive, hands-on public programs and events for the Community Education Lab, which is located on the ground floor of the Jerome L. Greene Science Center.
An innovative digital art installation on the ground floor of the new Jerome L. Greene Science Center on Columbia’s Manhattanville campus invites visitors to peer inside the brain and meet the neuroscientists who are working upstairs to unravel its complexities.

Columbia’s Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute and BioBus today announce a partnership aimed at bringing new educational opportunities to schools and community centers across Upper Manhattan and the Bronx.

Thomas M. Jessell, codirector, and Sarah Woolley, principal investigator at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute discuss how the Jerome L. Greene Science Center in the new Manhattanville campus was designed for discovery.

Columbia Great Grad 2016 Kathleen Bachynski

Photo by Christina Gupfinger

Kathleen Bachynski, who is receiving a doctorate in sociomedical sciences, studies the health risks of youth sports. Her dissertation on the dangers of football has been widely praised and was featured in the New England Journal of Medicine.
John Cunningham, Assistant Professor of Statistics

Photo by Michael DiVito

The quest to unravel the mysteries of the brain has made neuroscience one of today’s most exciting research fields.

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