Neuroscience

John Cunningham, Assistant Professor of Statistics

Photo by Michael DiVito

The quest to unravel the mysteries of the brain has made neuroscience one of today’s most exciting research fields.

What the Film Inside Out Can Teach Us About the Brain, the Mind and Ourselves

00:01 Behind the Scenes of Inside Out 
1:48 Science and Memory 
4:19 Inside Out in the Classroom 
4:58 Watching Inside Out as a Parent and a Scientist

Nima Mesgarani, Sameer Sheth Nueroscience Engineering RISE Columbia University

Nima Mesgarani (left) and Sameer Sheth are tackling the question of how multiple regions of the brain interact with and support one another to produce comprehension. Photo by Michael Dames. 

How do we know the difference between sarcasm and sincerity, or understand that in many social situations people don’t always say what they mean?

"Productively is the way to age," says Ruth Finkelstein, associate director of Columbia’s Robert N. Butler Aging Center. She discusses the center's interdisciplinary approach to studying aging and the implications of longer lifespans on society.
Kelley Remole answers local schoolchildren's questions on the brain

Kelley Remole, Zuckerman Institute's director of neuroscience outreach (center), answers local schoolchildren's questions on the brain.

Kelley Remole has been interested in science since she was a child.

This summer’s announcement that the Large Hadron Supercollider in Geneva had detected likely proof of the Higgs boson, an elusive and long-sought particle, brought back memories for Columbia neuroscientist Larry Abbott.

In the movie Still Alice, Julianne Moore plays a Columbia linguistics professor who is diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s, an extremely rare version of the disease.

Yaakov Stern, a professor in the departments in Neurology, Psychiatry, and Psychology, is affiliated with the Sergievsky Center and the Taub Institute. His research centers on age-related changes in memory, and why similar patients may show more cognitive deficit than others.

 

Franck Polleux, a professor of neuroscience, joined the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute in 2013, where he studies the early brain development in mammals as well as the parts of the brain that lose synapses during early stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

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