Neuroscience

BRAINYAC: The Zuckerman Institute’s Brain Research Apprenticeships in New York at Columbia

Elizabeth Hillman, associate professor of biomedical engineering, leads a team that is developing new imaging methods for the living brain.

Thomas Jessell, PhD, the Claire Tow Professor of Motor Neuron Disorders in the Departments of Neuroscience and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at Columbia University, is the recipient of the 2014 Neuroscience Prize of The Gruber Foundation.

Columbia campus

Three Columbia professors have been named members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Election to NAS, in recognition of "distinguished and continuing achievements in original research," is considered one of the highest honors a scientist or engineer can receive.

Neuroscience at Columbia

Laurence Abbott, PhD, the William Bloor Professor of Neuroscience, was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of his distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.

Merkel cells (pink) and neurons (blue)—located just beneath the surface of the skin—create our ability to feel fine details and textures. Photo: Kara Marshall.

Touch is the last frontier of sensory neuroscience. Until now, almost nothing has been known about the cells and molecules responsible for initiating our sense of touch.

School students arrived at the New York State Psychiatric Institute’s Kolb Annex on the Columbia University Medical Center campus March 12 to participate in the annual Community Brain Expo, cosponsored by the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University.

School students arrived at the New York State Psychiatric Institute’s Kolb Annex on the Columbia University Medical Center campus March 12 to participate in the annual Community Brain Expo, cosponsored by the Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute at Columbia University.

Ask Thomas Jessell why he has dedicated his career to understanding the neurobiology of movement, and he puts it in simple terms: “Movement is the overt expression of all behaviors—without movement, intent and desire can be planned and felt but never realized.” Whether it’s the pumping hea

Ask Thomas Jessell why he has dedicated his career to understanding the neurobiology of movement, and he puts it in simple terms: “Movement is the overt expression of all behaviors—without movement, intent and desire can be planned and felt but never realized.” Whether it’s the pumping hea

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