Neuroscience

Neuroscience at Columbia

Using high-resolution functional MRI (fMRI) imaging in patients with Alzheimer’s disease and in mouse models of the disease, Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have clarified three fundamental issues about Alzheimer’s: where it starts, why it starts there, and how it spr

An image of newly synthesized proteins in live hippocampal neurons.

In the search to understand memory, Wei Min is looking at cells at the most basic level, long before the formation of neurons and synapses. The assistant professor of chemistry studies the synthesis of proteins, the building blocks of the body formed using genetic code from DNA.

The researchers have identified a protein—RbAp48—that, when increased in aged wild-type mice, improves memory back to that of young wild-type mice. In the image, yellow shows the increased RbAp48 in the dentate gyrus. Image credit: Elias Pavlopoulos, PhD/Columbia University Medical Cente

Study points to possible treatments and confirms distinction between memory loss due to aging and that of Alzheimer's

Charles Zuker has devoted his career to unraveling the neurobiology of the senses—especially taste, but he is quick to tell you that it’s not because of some inherent fascination with bitter, sweet, and salty truths.

Speaking. Seeing. Hearing. Thinking. Remembering. Understanding this sentence and making a decision about whether or not to read on.

Psychologists and criminal defense attorneys have long argued that the adolescent brain is different from the brain of a child or an adult.

The only problem? They couldn’t prove it.

Speaking. Seeing. Hearing. Thinking. Remembering. Understanding this sentence and making a decision about whether or not to read on.

A microscope image of a nerve cell and its many branches (or dendrites) in a deep layer of a rat's cerebral cortex.

Speaking. Seeing. Hearing. Thinking. Remembering. Understanding this sentence and making a decision about whether or not to read on.

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger announced Dec. 17 that Mortimer B. Zuckerman has pledged $200 million to endow a Mind Brain Behavior Institute to support interdisciplinary neuroscience research and discovery by scholars across the University.

Sarah Woolley Neuroscientist Studies Songbirds

Anita Burgos stands inside an enclosure with zebra finches in Sarah Woolley's lab during the summer of 2009. Photo by Eileen Barroso

Every animal has its own specializations—hawks can spot their prey a mile away. Human beings, among other things, have the rare capacity to appreciate language and music.

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