Physics

Editor's Note: Tune in to The Charlie Rose show on July 9 at 11 p.m. to see Columbia Physics Professors Michael Tuts and Brian Greene discuss the latest Higgs developments. Some 75 Columbia faculty members, post-docs, students and friends gathered in Low Library at 3 a.m.

It’s an unlikely place to build a NASA telescope: a leafy estate in Irvington, N.Y., that once belonged to the son of Alexander Hamilton.

In anticipation of the potential for experimental verification of the existence of the Higgs boson—a long-hypothesized particle thought responsible for endowing other elementary particles with mass—the World Leaders Forum hosted a special program, co-sponsored by the Columbia Science Initi

Sean C. Solomon

Columbia University President Lee C. Bollinger and Provost John H. Coatsworth have named Sean C. Solomon to be director of Columbia’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory.

A scanning tunneling microscope in Abhay Pasupathy’s lab used to measure the chemical properties of graphene. The tall cylindrical component on the right is a cryogenic chamber used to keep the ultra-strong carbon material at a temperature of minus-450 degrees Fahrenheit. Top left inset: A color-coded image of electrons around a nitrogen atom (red) embedded in the honeycomb-like surface of graphene (blue).

In a soundproof room in Pupin Hall, a futuristic-looking metallic apparatus is creating three-dimensional images of a material that may one day power a new generation of smaller and faster electronic devices.

President Bollinger with T.D. Lee at the Sept. 13 reception held in Professor Lee's honor. Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

When T.D. Lee was hired by Columbia as an assistant professor in 1953, he joined what was arguably one of the greatest physics departments ever assembled.

If we think of the atmosphere as a sponge, we can imagine that the sponge is very dry in the western US, and almost full over humid regions in the eastern US. The addition of moisture to the atmosphere from the land surface in these humid regions makes the sponge leak (makes rain fall). In the west, the dry sponge soaks up any moisture the land surface can contribute without initiating rainfall: rainfall in the west is only initiated by other mechanisms. Credit: Kirsten Findell, NOAA/GFDL
A team of researchers from Columbia Engineering, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, and Rutgers University has now demonstrated that evaporation from the land surface is able to modify summertime rainfall east of the Mississippi and in the monsoonal region in the southern U.S.

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