Politics

Editor’s Note: The above video interview took place in July 2012, immediately following news of the election and the ongoing issues surrounding violence and journalists in Mexico. When Pablo Piccato was a Ph.D.

John Huber works with a student during a daily lab session in Cairo. Huber arranged for students to work with "Stata," a sophisticated software tool applied quantitatively to political science research questions.

As the eyes of the world focused on Egypt’s transition to democracy, Columbia University political science faculty members conducted a quantitative research workshop for aspiring social scientists at The American University in Cairo just weeks before Egypt’s historic presidential elections

Shelley Mayer

Shelley Mayer has traded her Morningside Heights office for a seat in Albany.

Alan Krueger, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisors, spoke at the conference in Low Library on April 26.
Professor Richard Gardner reports to former President Bill Clinton on his work as U.S. ambassador to Spain. Gardner held that position from 1993 to 1997.

More Than 100 Former Students Will Return to Columbia for a Conference in Honor of Professor Richard Gardner as He Preprares to Retire After Six Decades

Pakistani journalist Ahmed Rashid spoke of the tenuous state of U.S. involvement in Afghanistan and Pakistan. Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

The United States faces few good choices in its dealings with Afghanistan and Pakistan, says a longtime expert in the region, and must take a “longer view” than what has been exhibited in a decade plus of conflict.

David Phillips is a leader in global peace-building efforts.

David L. Phillips believes violent conflict is not inevitable. As director of Columbia’s Program on Peace-building and Rights, Phillips’s office is on the Morningside campus, but his real work takes place in trouble spots across the globe.

Timothy Frye Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

In the late 1980s, Timothy Frye, a recent Middlebury College graduate with a B.A. in Russian language and literature, went for the first time to the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, where Mikhail Gorbachev had just come to power.

North Korea expert Charles Armstrong. Image credit: Eileen Barroso/Columbia University

Fourteen years ago, North Korea’s calendar was changed so that time officially began in 1912—the birth year of Kim Il Sung, who ruled the communist nation from its founding in 1948.

STATE LEGISLATURE FAILED TO REACH AGREEMENT; STATE SUPREME COURT HAS NEW DEADLINE OF FEB.

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