Psychology

Close-up photo of Michael Slepian in a navy blue blazer standing in front the Lerner Hall's glass exterior
Michael Slepian teaches a course on negotiation, a process that often involves deciding how much and what to tell the other side.
Dana Kanze and Mark Conley

From left to right: Dana Kanze and Mark Conley. Photo by Eileen Barroso

When Dana Kanze and her business partner were pitching their startup for funding in 2009, they took turns talking to venture capitalists. Then and in ongoing conversations with prospective investors, Kanze noticed that questions addressed to her differed from those addressed to him.

Malia Mason with short blonde hair resting her right arm on a rail, wearing an outfit by MM LaFleur.

Photo by Frances F. Denny for MM. LaFleur

Malia Mason studies how people regulate their attention—or don’t—and what implications that may have for students, managers and employees.
Frances Champagne smiling, with short brown hair, and a purple shirt.

Forget nature vs. nurture. Scientists now know that maternal behavior can change offspring in ways that may be passed on to future generations.

Marcos Rocha Jr. Columbia University Grad 2016
Marcos Rocha, Jr., grew up in Spanish Harlem, but went halfway around the world with the Marines before he got to the University. It was during those tours of duty that Rocha saw the serious psychological issues faced by returning veterans.
Valerie Purdie-Vaughns

Photo by Eileen Barroso

When Valerie Purdie-Vaughns was in high school, she was recruited by Columbia to play basketball, and she still has a vivid memory of what her guidance counselor said.

The issue of race is foremost in the nation’s consciousness as events in Ferguson, Mo. unfold. But for Valerie Purdie-Vaughns, there is a more important message.

Photo by David Dini

Walter Mischel, the psychologist renowned for the groundbreaking study known as the “marshmallow test,” has finally decided to tell the story of that research for a general audience.

Neuroscience thumbnail

On his website, Carl Hart describes himself as a scientist, an activist and an educator, in that order. Now he can add award-winning book author for his widely praised memoir, "High Price."

Photo by Eileen Barroso

As a Business School professor who has won awards for teaching excellence, Daniel Ames doesn’t seem like someone associated with mind reading.

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