Race

Alondra Nelson Columbia Dean of Social Sciences

Photo by Jörg Meyer

Alondra Nelson was an eight-year-old when the television adaptation of Alex Haley’s Roots aired in 1977 to an audience of 130 million people. “We knew it was very important,” she said.

Desmond Patton

Photo by John Pinderhughes

Prof. Desmond Patton looks at conflict, culture and language on social media and then develops algorithms to detect instances of aggression.
Alondra Nelson Columbia Dean of Social Sciences

Alondra Nelson, Columbia’s dean of social science and professor of sociology, will serve as faculty lead to the Atlantic Fellows program.

The program will empower and connect dynamic individuals committed to working together across disciplines and borders to advance fairer, healthier, more inclusive societies.
Columbia President Lee C. Bollinger teaching.

Columbia President Lee C. Bollinger teaching.

When in June the Supreme Court issued a long-awaited ruling in Fisher v. University of Texas that upheld affirmative action in college admissions, the decision was widely hailed as a decisive victory recognizing the value of diversity in higher education.

Sociologist Carla Shedd, Columbia University, by Barbara Alper
Carla Shedd focuses her research on young people because their voices are missing from much sociological research. “I want to make visible the people who are most affected by policy.”
Karl Jacoby Borderland History Columbia Professor
The unusual life story is told in a new book titled "The Strange Career of William Ellis: The Texas Slave Who Became a Mexican Millionaire" by Karl Jacoby, a professor in the history department and the Center for Study of Ethnicity and Race. Ellis “learned how to be what people wanted him to be, and how to be sure that people would see what they want to see."
Martin Luther King Jr. in the Columbia Spectator
Image courtesy Columbia University Archives
On October 27, 1961, Martin Luther King Jr. addressed a group of students, faculty and members of the community at the McMillan Theatre (now the Miller Theatre) at the invitation of The Columbia Owl, a then-weekly publication of the School of General Studies.

Congressman John Lewis’ Life of Civil Rights Leadership Chronicled in Graphic Novels

Race Economics Dan O'Flaherty Columbia University

Brendan O’Flaherty was a teenager in Newark, N.J. in the 1960s, when the city was engulfed by racially charged political battles and violence.

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