Research

In something as tiny as a speck of dust lies the potential to change earth’s climate. When winds blow iron-rich dust off the continents, they give the plant-like algae floating on the surface of the oceans added nutrients to grow faster.

The Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute has named David M. Greenberg as its first executive director. The Zuckerman Institute was established in 2012 with a $200 million gift from New York philanthropist and business leader Mortimer B. Zuckerman.

In a study published today in Nature Communications, a research team led by Ken Shepard, professor of electrical engineering and biomedical engineering at Columbia Engineering, and Lars Dietrich, assistant professor of biological sciences at Columbia University, has demonstrated that integ

Sean Manning Udell (CC’11) is less than three years out of college, working as an administrator at a new charter school in Denver. Yet he’s getting emails from academic researchers seeking his help.

New details about how motor neurons die in ALS have been uncovered by a new cell-culture system that combines spinal cord or brain cells from ALS patients with human motor neurons. The culture system shows that patient astrocytes (shown here with a blue-stained nucleus) release a toxin that kills motor neurons via a recently discovered process described as a “controlled cellular explosion.” Image: Diane Re.

In most cases of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, a toxin released by cells that normally nurture neurons in the brain and spinal cord can trigger loss of the nerve cells affected in the disease, Columbia researchers reported today in the online edition of the

DNA curtains—devised by P&S professor Eric Greene—provide a new way to study DNA-protein interactions. DNA strands are green; proteins are pink. Image: Eric Greene.

Using a dazzling technology to watch proteins collide, clutch, and slide along strands of DNA, researchers at Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons and UC-Berkeley report online in Nature that they have uncovered some of the secrets behind a powerful new genetic engineer

An evaporation harvesting device made of Legos, a spore-coated rubber sheet, a coil and a magnet. The device produces electricity when sheet bends and straightens in response to moisture. Image Credit: Xi Chen/Columbia University

Legos may seem like an unlikely foundation for scientific research, but the building blocks have been a part of Ozgur Sahin’s work since he made a mechanical adding device with them when he was 11.

The Vilcek Foundation named Thomas M. Jessell as the winner of the 2014 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science. Awarded annually, the prizes honor the contributions of immigrants to the American arts and sciences, and include $100,000 cash awards. Dr.

Mutated beta-catenin in bone cells may cause up to 40 percent of acute myeloid leukemia cases. In the cells of healthy subjects (left), beta catenin proteins (red dots) sit along the outer edges of the cell. In approximately 40 percent of AML patients (right), abnormal beta-catenin proteins (red dots) move into the cell interior; in mouse models, this movement sets cancer-causing changes into motion. Credit: Dr. Aruna Kode/Kousteni lab, Columbia University Medical Center.

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a blood cancer, but for many patients the cancer may originate from an unusual source: a mutation in their bone cells.

Sonya Dyhrman’s interest in marine biology began when she was a child, exploring tidal pools with her grandfather on the coast near her Tacoma.

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