Research

In more than three decades as editor and publisher of "The Nation," Victor Navasky witnessed a staff uprising just once.

Engineering Professor Vijay Modi built an interactive map of annual energy consumption in New York City. Click the image to view. Image credit: Vijay Modi, Columbia University

Over the last five years, the amount of digital information worldwide has increased almost 2,000 percent, exceeding 2.8 trillion gigabytes—perhaps as many bits of information as there are stars in the universe.

David Sandalow (above left), an assistant secretary in the Department of Energy, will study a range of issues including U.S.-China energy relations, advanced vehicle technology policy, and clean energy finance.

As part of its commitment to pursuing research on the rapidly changing energy landscape and offering real-world solutions to our most pressing energy challenges, the new Center on Global Energy Policy (CGEP) at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) announ

Research at Columbia

African-Americans with a variant of the ABCA7 gene have almost double the risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer’s disease compared with African-Americans who lack the variant.

In suburban Clifton, New Jersey, a massive basalt flow (black rock, left) from the time of the End Triassic Extinction lies exposed in a former rock quarry, now behind a retirement home. A thin layer of sedimentary rock mostly covered in debris, at far right, records the sudden disappearance of many creatures. CLICK TO SEE VIDEO OF DRILLING IN NEW JERSEY. (Paul Olsen/Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory)

Scientists examining evidence across the world from New Jersey to North Africa say they have linked the abrupt disappearance of half of earth’s species 200 million years ago to a precisely dated set of gigantic volcanic eruptions.

When an estimated 7,000-ton meteor exploded in Earth’s atmosphere on Feb. 15, showering Siberia with debris, it put a spotlight on the fact that Earth is constantly bombarded with the detritus of the solar system.

Sarah Woolley Neuroscientist Studies Songbirds

Anita Burgos stands inside an enclosure with zebra finches in Sarah Woolley's lab during the summer of 2009. Photo by Eileen Barroso

Every animal has its own specializations—hawks can spot their prey a mile away. Human beings, among other things, have the rare capacity to appreciate language and music.

Rafael Yuste

The oldest known drawing of the nervous system is nearly a thousand years old, but scientists are still trying to understand how the human brain works.

History Professor Carl Wennerlind’s most recent book focuses on a financial system come undone, a public looking to its government for answers, and a monetary system badly in need of trust and transparency.

If Itsik Pe’er had a time machine, he would probably beam himself into the 11th century and collect DNA samples from the small community of Ashkenazi Jews living in Eastern Europe.

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