Research

John McWhorter

John McWhorter may be best known for his magazine and newspaper writing about race, but the Philadelphia native is at heart a dyed-in-the-wool academic whose first inkling that he would spend his life studying languages came when he was still a preschooler and heard someone speaking a fore

A new study by Columbia Engineering researchers finds that the infant brain does not control its blood flow in the same way as the adult brain.

Large study in Norway finds early timing of supplements is critical

Prenatal folic acid supplements appear to reduce the risk for autistic spectrum disorders, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

L-R: Don W. Cleveland, Kevin C. Eggan, Christopher E. Henderson, Daniel L. Doctoroff and Jeffrey Rothstein met at Henderson’s lab at Columbia University Medical Center to mark the launch of Target ALS. Image credit: Columbia University Medical Center

Daniel L. Doctoroff, Bloomberg LP CEO and president; David M.

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have identified a protein trafficking defect within brain cells that may underlie common non-familial forms of Parkinson’s disease.

Klaus Lackner’s approach to slowing global warming is to clean up the atmosphere—literally.

A digital microarray from the lab of Ken Shepard, a professor of electrical engineering, can measure individual DNA molecules, which are shown in this image. The new technology dramatically improves and simplifies genetic analysis.

Ken Shepard, a professor of electrical engineering, believes there is nowhere else in the world where he could do what he does. “Imagine a convergence of semiconductor technology and biotechnology. There is no company out there that has expertise in both,” he says.

An image of a nanoscale chip engineered by Peter Kinget's lab. He is attempting to build self-powered sensors that run on tiny bits of ambient solar energy, using so little power that their batteries never need replacing.

It’s relatively simple to build a device capable of detecting wireless signals if you don’t mind making one that consumes lots of power. It’s not so easy to design energy-efficient devices that function as well as the components they replace, or to do it at the nano scale.

Jim Yardley

Jim Yardley has seen firsthand how the nanotechnology field has exploded over the past decade. “It’s extremely exciting,” says the managing director of Columbia’s Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center.

An illustration of part of Professor Ozgur Sahin’s atomic force microscope, which measures mechanical forces at the molecular level. Seen here is the sharp silicon tip of the device, which scans an object’s surface and bends in response to force.

One of Ozgur Sahin’s first machines was a mechanical adding device made from Legos. He made it when he was 11 and hasn’t stopped making gadgets since.

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