Research

Sarah Woolley Neuroscientist Studies Songbirds

Anita Burgos stands inside an enclosure with zebra finches in Sarah Woolley's lab during the summer of 2009. Photo by Eileen Barroso

Every animal has its own specializations—hawks can spot their prey a mile away. Human beings, among other things, have the rare capacity to appreciate language and music.

Rafael Yuste

The oldest known drawing of the nervous system is nearly a thousand years old, but scientists are still trying to understand how the human brain works.

History Professor Carl Wennerlind’s most recent book focuses on a financial system come undone, a public looking to its government for answers, and a monetary system badly in need of trust and transparency.

If Itsik Pe’er had a time machine, he would probably beam himself into the 11th century and collect DNA samples from the small community of Ashkenazi Jews living in Eastern Europe.

John McWhorter

John McWhorter may be best known for his magazine and newspaper writing about race, but the Philadelphia native is at heart a dyed-in-the-wool academic whose first inkling that he would spend his life studying languages came when he was still a preschooler and heard someone speaking a fore

A new study by Columbia Engineering researchers finds that the infant brain does not control its blood flow in the same way as the adult brain.

Large study in Norway finds early timing of supplements is critical

Prenatal folic acid supplements appear to reduce the risk for autistic spectrum disorders, according to a study in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).

L-R: Don W. Cleveland, Kevin C. Eggan, Christopher E. Henderson, Daniel L. Doctoroff and Jeffrey Rothstein met at Henderson’s lab at Columbia University Medical Center to mark the launch of Target ALS. Image credit: Columbia University Medical Center

Daniel L. Doctoroff, Bloomberg LP CEO and president; David M.

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers have identified a protein trafficking defect within brain cells that may underlie common non-familial forms of Parkinson’s disease.

Klaus Lackner’s approach to slowing global warming is to clean up the atmosphere—literally.

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