Science

An artist's depiction of two neutron stars colliding. (Carnegie Institution for Science)

Astronomers have for the first time witnessed a pair of dead neutron stars colliding, and have confirmed that the heaviest metals in the universe, from gold to platinum, are formed in explosions like this one spotted 130 million light-years away.

Energy harvested from evaporation can cut by half the amount of water lost to natural evaporation, researchers say.  Water-strapped cities with growing populations and energy needs could benefit most, including greater Phoenix, served by the above reservoir and irrigation system fed by the Colorado River. (Central Arizona Project)

In the first evaluation of evaporation as a renewable energy source, researchers at Columbia University find that U.S. lakes and reservoirs could generate 325 gigawatts of power, nearly 70 percent of what the United States currently produces.

Ivaylo Ivanov is studying how commensal bacteria (green) interact with intestinal tissues (pink) to activate immune cells in the gut to fight infection. Image courtesy of Ivanov.

Ivaylo Ivanov, an immunologist at Columbia who studies the role of intestinal bacteria in the body’s immune response, in collaboration with Caltech researcher Pamela Bjorkman, has received a two-year, $200,000 Innovation Fund award from the Pew Charitable Trusts. The grant will fund Ivanov’s ongoing research with Bjorkman.

Photo courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

A new study suggests that a prediction explaining the unusual brightness of some astronomical explosions, first developed by Columbia astronomers and physicists, is correct.
Nikolaus Kriegeskorte at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute organized a three-day conference that starts brings together cognitive scientists, neuroscientists and computer scientists. Kriegeskorte spoke with us about the event and his research.
Sebastian Will, assistant professor of physics, and a team of researchers at MIT have taken an important step toward the long-sought goal of a quantum computer, which in theory should be capable of vastly faster computations than conventional computers for certain kinds of problems.

Illustration by Nicoletta Barolini

Researchers at Columbia University have made a significant step toward breaking the so-called “color barrier” of light microscopy for biological systems, allowing for much more comprehensive, system-wide labeling and imaging of a greater number of biomolecules in living cells and tissues t

Lee C. Bollinger
President Lee C. Bollinger has agreed to serve as co-chair of the NAS committee on the Future of Voting, which is studying the issues of accessibility, reliability and verifiable technology in relation to voting in the U.S.
Mike Massimino Astronaut Columbia University

Photo Courtesy of NASA

Hurtling under the ocean at record speed on nuclear subs and fixing frozen bolts in outer space are not ordinary jobs, although they can be for engineers.

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