Science Digest

A portrait shot of Andrew Millis
Columbia University Physics Professor Andrew Millis has been named the 2017 recipient of the Hamburg Prize for Theoretical Physics for his groundbreaking research on the electronic properties of correlated materials.
Amelia Wolf walking through a field of flowers and a mountain scenery behind her.

Amelia Wolf in the California field she used to study what effect diversity loss would have on the remaining plants.

Gardeners and nature lovers have noticed that plants are flowering earlier every year—a phenomenon generally attributed to climate change.

Columbia University researchers have developed an extremely low-cost, low-maintenance, on-site dipstick test they hope will aid in the surveillance and early detection of fungal pathogens responsible for major human disease, agricultural damage and food spoilage worldwide.

In this cover drawing for Cell Reports, Columbia researchers illustrate the concept that neurons fire in a consistent pattern during a seizure no matter how quickly the seizure spreads. The above string pattern stays the same regardless of whether both hands move closer or farther apart. (Michael Wenzel) 

Of the 50 million people who suffer from epilepsy worldwide, a third fail to respond to medication. As the search for better drugs continues, researchers are still trying to make sense of how seizures start and spread.

A wide range of people from students and scientists to business people and educators gathered at Columbia University recently for the first conference on a burgeoning approach to science in space: conducting that research in collaboration with the private space industry.

Deep sea snapping shrimp in their natural color captured by Columbia researchers. Photo by K.S. MacDonald

In the world of evolutionary research, scientists studying the evolution of eusocial societies have traditionally relied on information gathered from studying terrestrial insects.

Columbia University Mathematician Mohammed Abouzaid
Professor Mohammed said a simplified example of his work is finding ways to measure objects, such as a coffee mug, with the techniques one would use to measure objects with a more geometric shape.