Science Digest

Photo courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

A new study suggests that a prediction explaining the unusual brightness of some astronomical explosions, first developed by Columbia astronomers and physicists, is correct.
Nikolaus Kriegeskorte at Columbia's Zuckerman Institute organized a three-day conference that starts brings together cognitive scientists, neuroscientists and computer scientists. Kriegeskorte spoke with us about the event and his research.
In a study analyzing the genomes of 210,000 people in the United States and Britain, Columbia researchers find that the genetic variants linked to Alzheimer’s disease and heavy smoking are less frequent in people with longer lifespans, suggesting that natural selection is weeding out these unfavorable variants in both populations.
Ken Shepard
Ken Shepard is part of a growing push to develop brain-computer interfaces to repair senses and skills lost to injury or disease.
2009 solar eclipse image by NASA JAXA

Image Courtesy of NASA/JAXA

On August 21, millions of people along a path stretching from Oregon to South Carolina will bear witness as the moon slips over the entire face of the sun, obscuring its light and allowing only the glow of its outer atmosphere to mark its place in the sky.
Sebastian Will, assistant professor of physics, and a team of researchers at MIT have taken an important step toward the long-sought goal of a quantum computer, which in theory should be capable of vastly faster computations than conventional computers for certain kinds of problems.
A portrait shot of Andrew Millis
Columbia University Physics Professor Andrew Millis has been named the 2017 recipient of the Hamburg Prize for Theoretical Physics for his groundbreaking research on the electronic properties of correlated materials.
Amelia Wolf walking through a field of flowers and a mountain scenery behind her.

Amelia Wolf in the California field she used to study what effect diversity loss would have on the remaining plants.

Gardeners and nature lovers have noticed that plants are flowering earlier every year—a phenomenon generally attributed to climate change.

Columbia University researchers have developed an extremely low-cost, low-maintenance, on-site dipstick test they hope will aid in the surveillance and early detection of fungal pathogens responsible for major human disease, agricultural damage and food spoilage worldwide.

In this cover drawing for Cell Reports, Columbia researchers illustrate the concept that neurons fire in a consistent pattern during a seizure no matter how quickly the seizure spreads. The above string pattern stays the same regardless of whether both hands move closer or farther apart. (Michael Wenzel) 

Of the 50 million people who suffer from epilepsy worldwide, a third fail to respond to medication. As the search for better drugs continues, researchers are still trying to make sense of how seizures start and spread.

Pages