Social Sciences

Alondra Nelson Columbia Dean of Social Sciences

Photo by Jörg Meyer

Alondra Nelson was an eight-year-old when the television adaptation of Alex Haley’s Roots aired in 1977 to an audience of 130 million people. “We knew it was very important,” she said.

Alondra Nelson Columbia Dean of Social Sciences

Alondra Nelson, Columbia’s dean of social science and professor of sociology, will serve as faculty lead to the Atlantic Fellows program.

The program will empower and connect dynamic individuals committed to working together across disciplines and borders to advance fairer, healthier, more inclusive societies.

They supervise academic departments and research centers. They oversee faculty searches and hires. They help set budget priorities and research funding. They manage allegations of conflicts of interest. They even get involved in renovations and space requests.

Alondra Nelson, the new dean for the social sciences in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, says part of the job is to be “an advocate and a cheerleader” for the departments of anthropology, economic

Sharon Marcus, (left) Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature, and Alondra Nelson, professor of sociology and director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality.

Alondra Nelson and Sharon Marcus become divisional deans in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, effective July 1. Nelson, professor of sociology and director of the Institute for Research on Women, Gender, and Sexuality, was named Dean of Social Sciences.

Columbia campus

Three Columbia professors have been named members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Election to NAS, in recognition of "distinguished and continuing achievements in original research," is considered one of the highest honors a scientist or engineer can receive.

Saskia Sassen

Saskia Sassen, the Robert S. Lynd Professor of Sociology, has won the 2013 Prince of Asturias Award for social science for her contribution to urban sociology and to the analysis of the social, economic and political dimensions of globalization, according to the prize jury.

Maeve Kerr, a high school student on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, spent part of the summer helping a Columbia researcher measure how patients respond to advice from health care providers.