Teaching

Columbia School of Nursing
Citing the changing demands of health care, Columbia University School of Nursing has instituted a new 15-month master’s program. The Masters Direct Entry program will replace a 12-month Entry to Practice program for non-nurse college graduates. The school no longer will offer a bachelor’s degree in nursing.
Melissa Stockwell does clinical trials for a living. Brent Stockwell teaches education. They have also been married for 15 years, but it's just now they finally merged their professional expertise as well. Together they created a blended learning technique for the modern-day classroom.

Great teachers are passionate about the classroom, as evidenced by the 11 faculty members honored this year with Lenfest Distinguished Teaching Awards. Some were nominated by their students, others by their fellow professors or department chairs.

A number of years ago, a student reviewing a class taught by Dorothea von Mücke summed up how the professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures taught the course Literature Humanities this way: “Professor von Mücke refuse

As an undergraduate at Purdue University, Brad Garton majored in pharmacy because “growing up in the Midwest, being a musician wasn’t a legitimate job.”

Columbia’s urban setting is central to Rebecca Kobrin’s teaching and research.

Stathis Gourgouris, a professor of classics, English and comparative literature who directs the Institute for Comparative Literature and Society, believes that antiquity has relevance to contemporary life. In the classroom he strives to make connections across centuries and regions.  

Asked what makes a good teacher or good student, Molly Murray (CC’94) responds simply, “Curiosity … an openness to new ideas and a willingness to follow them where they lead, into the library or out of it.” She also takes the word “curiosity” back to its Latin root, cura or “care,” and add

For Souleymane Bachir Diagne, a professor of French and philosophy, teaching is about finding the right balance in the classroom.

Patricia Dailey, an associate professor of English and comparative literature, specializes in medieval literature and critical theory, adapting her teaching style to individual classes.

Pages