Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute

Olajide Williams and Sidney Hankerson

From left: Olajide Williams and Sidney Hankerson will lead expanded stroke awareness and community mental health programs in the Jerome L. Greene Science Center.

Neurologist Olajide Williams and psychiatrist Sidney Hankerson are known for their pioneering approaches to improving public health in Harlem and Washington Heights. The Wellness Center will operate with support from Columbia’s Zuckerman Institute.
Kelley Remole answers local schoolchildren's questions on the brain

Kelley Remole, Zuckerman Institute's director of neuroscience outreach (center), answers local schoolchildren's questions on the brain.

Kelley Remole has been interested in science since she was a child.

Professor Daphna Shohamy, lead researcher. Photo by Eileen Barroso

Researchers at Columbia University and the University of Colorado at Boulder have found that expectations can drive changes in the brain, highlighting an important link between psychology and medicine.

Over the summer Idniel Paula headed to Nobel laureate and University Professor Eric Kandel’s neuroscience lab, donned a white coat and peered through a microscope.

Thomas Jessell, PhD, the Claire Tow Professor of Motor Neuron Disorders in the Departments of Neuroscience and of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics at Columbia University, is the recipient of the 2014 Neuroscience Prize of The Gruber Foundation.

Ask Thomas Jessell why he has dedicated his career to understanding the neurobiology of movement, and he puts it in simple terms: “Movement is the overt expression of all behaviors—without movement, intent and desire can be planned and felt but never realized.” Whether it’s the pumping hea

The Mortimer B. Zuckerman Mind Brain Behavior Institute has named David M. Greenberg as its first executive director. The Zuckerman Institute was established in 2012 with a $200 million gift from New York philanthropist and business leader Mortimer B. Zuckerman.

The researchers have identified a protein—RbAp48—that, when increased in aged wild-type mice, improves memory back to that of young wild-type mice. In the image, yellow shows the increased RbAp48 in the dentate gyrus. Image credit: Elias Pavlopoulos, PhD/Columbia University Medical Cente

Study points to possible treatments and confirms distinction between memory loss due to aging and that of Alzheimer's

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