Columbia Ink

June 28, 2013Bookmark and Share
The Great Civilized Conversation: Education for a World Community BY WILLIAM THEODORE DE BARY The Great Civilized Conversation: Education for a World Community
BY WILLIAM THEODORE DE BARY
Columbia University Press
In this collection of essays, de Bary argues that a classical liberal arts education is more necessary than ever and outlines a plan to update existing core curricula by incorporating classics from both Eastern and Western traditions. The John Mitchell Mason Professor Emeritus and Provost Emeritus of Columbia, de Bary establishes a concrete link between teaching the classics of world civilizations and furthering global humanism. His selection of texts from Islamic, Indian, Chinese, Japanese and Western sources share many of the same values and educational purposes and em- phasize humanity and civility.
     
The Family Guide to Mental Health Care BY LLOYD I. SEDERER The Family Guide to Mental Health Care
BY LLOYD I. SEDERER
W. W. Norton & Company
Sederer, an adjunct professor of epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health and medical director of the New York State Office of Mental Health, has written a comprehensive guide for those who have loved ones suffering from mental illness. With a foreword by actress and mental health advocate Glenn Close, the book helps readers understand depression, bipolar illness, schizophrenia and many more disorders, covering everything from the first signs of a problem to treatment options. Sederer describes real-life scenarios in plain English and includes checklists of questions to bring to doctors’ appointments.
     
Balance: The Economics of Great Powers from Ancient Rome to Modern America BY GLENN HUBBARD Balance: The Economics of Great Powers from Ancient Rome to Modern America
BY GLENN HUBBARD
Simon & Schuster
In his latest book, Hubbard, dean of the Business School and former chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President George W. Bush, teams up with Tim Kane, chief economist at the Hudson Institute, to present a sweeping economic history that explores why powerful civilizations break down under severe fiscal imbalances—and why America could be next. The book traces the triumphs and mistakes of ancient civilizations and modern states and challenges America to address its economic and political threats, including the national debt and entitlement spending.
     
Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America’s Children BY DAVID ROSNER Lead Wars: The Politics of Science and the Fate of America’s Children
BY DAVID ROSNER
University of California Press
In this examination of lead poisoning over the past half century, Rosner, the Ronald H. Lauterstein Professor of Sociomedical Sciences at the Mailman School of Public Health, and co-author Gerald Markowitz focus on one of the most contentious battles in public health history.They show how the epidemic has changed and highlight problems public health agencies face today preventing the chronic illness linked to low levels of toxic exposure. The authors also chronicle obstacles faced by public health workers in the anti-regulatory climate that began during the Reagan era and stymied efforts to elimi- nate lead from the environment.
     
The End of Competitive Advantage: How to Keep Your Strategy Moving as Fast as Your Business BY RITA G. MCGRATH The End of Competitive Advantage: How to Keep Your Strategy Moving as Fast as Your Business
BY RITA G. MCGRATH
Harvard Business Review Press
McGrath, a curriculum specialist in executive education at the Business School, looks at how changes in business have created a gap between traditional approaches to strategy and the way the real world works now. She finds that most leaders are using frameworks designed for a different era and based on the increasingly irrelevant idea that the purpose of strategy is to achieve a sustainable competitive advantage. She proposes instead a new model: transient competitive advantage. Her playbook for winning: capturing opportunities quickly, exploiting them decisively and moving on even before they are exhausted.
     
The Sentimental Touch: The Language of Feeling in the Age of Managerialism BY AARON RITZENBERG The Sentimental Touch: The Language of Feeling in the Age of Managerialism
BY AARON RITZENBERG
Fordham University Press
Ritzenberg, associate director of first-year writing in the Department of English and Comparative Literature, explores the enduring power of sentimental literature—work written specifically to convey and inspire deep feeling. He notes its persistence in American literature long after the rise of capitalism ushered in an era of bureaucratic systems at odds with individual expression. Analyzing novels by Harriet Beecher Stowe, Mark Twain, Sherwood Anderson and Nathanael West, he demonstrates that sentimental language changes but remains powerful, even in works by authors who self-consciously write against the sentimental tradition.
     
A Country of Cities: A Manifesto for an Urban America BY VISHAAN CHAKRABARTI A Country of Cities: A Manifesto for an Urban America
BY VISHAAN CHAKRABARTI
Metropolis Books
Chakrabarti, the Marc Holliday Associate Professor of Real Estate Development, argues that well-designed cities are the key to solving America’s great national challenges: environmental degradation, unsustainable consumption, economic stagnation, rising public health costs and decreasing social mobility. Chakrabarti offers a wealth of information about cities, suburbs and exurbs, looking at how they developed across the 50 states and have contributed to prosperity and globalization. If we can intelligently increase the density of cities by building the transit systems, schools, parks and other infrastructure to support them, he says, we can create both jobs and a sustainable society.
     
Practicing Literary Theory in the Middle Ages: Ethics and the Mixed Form in Chaucer, Gower,Usk, and Hoccleve BY ELEANOR JOHNSON Practicing Literary Theory in the Middle Ages: Ethics and the Mixed Form in Chaucer, Gower,Usk, and Hoccleve
BY ELEANOR JOHNSON
University of Chicago Press
In her first book, Eleanor Johnson, assistant professor of English and comparative literature, considers the relationship between form and ethics in late medieval writing, proposing that the formal aspects of literary language are inextricable from its ethics. She examines the mixing of prose and lyrical poetry in a variety of Middle English texts—including Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde, the Canterbury Tales, Thomas Usk’s Testament of Love, John Gower’s Confessio amantis and Thomas Hoccleve’s autobiographical poetry. She also explores how authors use form to model ethical transformation for readers. 
 
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