Columbia Ink

Oct. 9, 2013Bookmark and Share
Raising Henry: A Memoir of Motherhood, Disability, & Discovery BY RACHEL ADAMS
Raising Henry: A Memoir of Motherhood, Disability, & Discovery
BY RACHEL ADAMS
Yale University Press
A highly personal story of one family’s encounter with disability, Raising Henry is an exploration of social prejudice, disability policy, genetics, prenatal testing, medical training and inclusive education. Adams, whose son Henry has Down syndrome, does research focusing on people with disabilities through Columbia’s Center for the Study of Social Difference. Her book chronicles the first three years of his life and her own transformative experience of unexpectedly becoming the mother of a disabled child. She untangles the contradictions of living in a society that is more enlightened and supportive of people with disabilities than ever before, yet is racing to perfect prenatal tests to prevent children like Henry from being born.
     
Focus: Use Different Ways of Seeing the World for Success and Influence BY HEIDI GRANT HALVORSON and EDWARD TORY HIGGINS Focus: Use Different Ways of Seeing the World for Success and Influence
BY HEIDI GRANT HALVORSON and EDWARD TORY HIGGINS
Hudson Street Press
In their new book, Higgins, the Stanley Schachter Professor of Psychology and Professor of Business, and Halvorson, associate director of the Business School’s Motivation Science Center, delve into two different types of motivation that drive human behavior. Individuals who are promotion-focused want to advance and avoid missed opportunities. Those who are prevention-focused want to minimize losses and keep things working. The authors describe how these divergent approaches apply to a wide range of situations, from selling products to managing employees and even getting a second date. Once you understand focus, they argue, you have the power to use it to get the results that you want.
     
Floating City: A Rogue Sociologist Lost and Found in New York’s Underground Economy BY SUDHIR VENKATESH Floating City: A Rogue Sociologist Lost and Found in New York’s Underground Economy
BY SUDHIR VENKATESH
Penguin Press
Sudhir Venkatesh, the William B. Ransford Professor of Sociology, interviews prostitutes and socialites, immigrants and academics, high-end drug bosses and street-level dealers to develop a portrait of New York’s underground economy, where illicit, often invisible transactions between rich and poor help weave together the whole city. Venkatesh shows how those who deal in drugs, sex work and undocumented labor bridge conventional divides between wealthy elites, desperate immigrants and destitute locals. By following a dozen New Yorkers in the shadowy world of illegal goods and services, he reveals New York’s vast underground economy to be an unlikely engine of social transformation and economic prosperity.
     
A History of African Motherhood: The Case of Uganda, 700-1900 BY RHIANNON STEPHENS A History of African Motherhood: The Case of Uganda, 700-1900
BY RHIANNON STEPHENS
Cambridge University Press
Stephens, an assistant professor in the History Department, explores the role of mothers in the North Nyanzan societies of Uganda. Motherhood created essential social and political connections that cut across patrilineal, cultural and linguistic divides. The importance of motherhood as a social institution meant that in chiefdoms and kingdoms, queen mothers were powerful officials who legitimated the power of kings. Using a centuries-long perspective and interdisciplinary approach that draws on his- torical linguistics, comparative ethnography, oral traditions and literature, Stephens shows the durability and complexity of motherhood in this African region.
     
Breaking the Line: The Season in Black College Football That Transformed the Sport and Changed the Course of Civil Rights BY SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN Breaking the Line: The Season in Black College Football That Transformed the Sport and Changed the Course of Civil Rights
BY SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN
Simon & Schuster
In September 1967, after three years of landmark civil rights laws and three months of urban riots, the football season began at Louisiana’s Grambling College and Florida A&M. The teams were led by two extraordinary coaches, Eddie Robinson and Jake Gaither, and two star quarterbacks, James Harris and Ken Riley. Freedman, a professor at the Journalism School, traces the rise of these four leaders as they stormed through the season, helping to compel the segregated colleges of the South to integrate their teams and redefining who could play quarterback in the NFL, who could be head coach, and who could run a franchise as general manager. Moving from the locker room to state capitol, from embattled cam- pus to packed stadium, he captures a pivotal time in American sport and society.
     
Shaping Jazz: Cities, Labels, and the Global Emergence of an Art Form BY DAMON J. PHILLIPS Shaping Jazz: Cities, Labels, and the Global Emergence of an Art Form
BY DAMON J. PHILLIPS
Princeton University Press
There are over a million jazz recordings, but only a few hundred tunes have been recorded repeatedly. Why did so few become jazz standards? Why do some songs get rerecorded by many musicians? Phillips, the James P. Gorman Professor of Business Strategy and a faculty affiliate at Columbia’s Center for Jazz Studies, explores the underappreciated yet crucial roles played by initial production deci- sions and markets in the development of early 20th century jazz. Phillips shows how record companies and their executives affect what music is created and its long-term popularity. Applying ideas about market emergence to a music’s commercialization, he offers a unique look at the origins of America’s groundbreaking art form.
     
The Balkan Prospect: Identity, Culture, and Politics in Greece after 1989 BY VANGELIS CALOTYCHOS The Balkan Prospect: Identity, Culture, and Politics in Greece after 1989
BY VANGELIS CALOTYCHOS
Palgrave Macmillan
Calotychos, associate professor of modern Greek literature and culture in the Classics Department, views the fall of the Iron Curtain and its significance from the perspective of Greece, which, in 1989, was alone among nations in being both European and Balkan. The borders separating Greek culture and society from its contiguous Balkan states came down, and Greeks had to reorient themselves toward their immediate neighbors and redefine their place in a new, more fluid world order. Calotychos shows how Greece and Europe were effectively held hostage to events in the Balkans at a moment when both intended to serve as the region’s welcoming hosts.
     
The Winter Sun Shines In: A Life of Masaoka Shiki BY DONALD KEENE The Winter Sun Shines In: A Life of Masaoka Shiki
BY DONALD KEENE
Columbia University Press
Keene, University Professor Emeritus and Shincho Professor of Japanese Literature, charts the poet Masaoka Shiki’s (1867-1902) revolutionary and often contradictory experiments with haiku and tanka. Rather than resist the vast social and cultural changes sweeping Japan in the 19th century, Shiki instead incorporated Western influences, a process that ensured the survival of these traditional genres and made the haiku one of Japan’s most influential cultural exports. Using accounts of the poet by his contemporaries and family and his own extensive readings of Shiki’s writings, Keene highlights random incidents and encounters in an impressionistic portrait of the poet’s life.
 
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