NewYorkStories

Joseph Ayala (CC’94) is the administrator of Columbia College’s 50-year-old service program, which works with local low-income and first generation college-bound students to help them finish high school and attend college.
These are some of the projects underway at the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation’s GSAPP Incubator that supports recent alumni seeking to develop innovative architectural and design projects.
They teach military veterans, Columbia undergraduates and homeless youth without pay or school credit. What they get is the opportunity to help others while gaining valuable teaching and mentoring experience.
The Robert D.L. Gardiner Foundation has donated $3 million to the Faculty of Arts and Sciences to establish the Robert Gardiner-Kenneth T. Jackson Professorship in the Department of History.
Wade McGillis has done research in the Caribbean off Puerto Rico and in watersheds in Haiti, but he always comes back to his laboratory in Piermont, N.Y., on the banks of the Hudson River.
On the south side of West 125th Street stands a four-story, century-old building whose façade is sheathed in milky white terracotta. When it was built in 1909, at the same time that the Morningside Heights campus, it was a state-of-the-art bottling plant for Sheffield Farms.
How do you make sure aging bridges that are vital links in the city’s transportation network are safe or keep the city’s sewer system from breaking down? These are among the questions that occupy Andrew Smyth and Patricia Culligan.
For Samuel Roberts, all of New York City is his classroom. Students taking his seminar on the history of race and mass incarceration go to see holding cells and talk to people awaiting arraignment in the five boroughs.
David Dinkins Archives Columbia University

Photo by Michael Dames

The life and career of New York’s first African American mayor, David N. Dinkins, is one for the history books. Now, there will be no better place than Columbia for scholars looking to write them.

Miller inaugurates a new holiday tradition, a playful production that brings to life Saint-Saëns’ musical “salute to feathers, fur, and fins”—Carnival of the Animals. A modern twist on Victorian toy theater, this imaginative staging combines music, scenic elements, puppetry, and movement, plus the clever verses of Ogden Nash. Curtain-raisers from the 16th Century to present-day set the stage and kindle the spirit of the holidays.

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