NewYorkStories

'El Diario La Prensa,' the nation’s oldest continuously publishing Spanish-language newspaper, has given the University some 5,000 photographs documenting the lives of New York’s Latinos and their contributions to the city and its culture.

Who’s on the Ballot, a new website that explains just that, was born out of a friendly conversation between SIPA Professor Ester Fuchs and her former student, William von Mueffling (CC’90, BUS’95). “William was complaining about the lack of information on the candidates, and I told him, ‘That’s ridiculous. Just look on the web,’” said Fuchs. “But I quickly realized it’s not that easy.”

This summer Mateo will begin a residency in pediatrics with a concentration in urban health and advocacy.

When she started medical school four years ago Camila Mateo felt an immediate connection to the neighborhood surrounding the College of Physicians and Surgeons. The language, the culture and the food were familiar to the daughter of two Dominican-born pediatricians. Her paternal grandmother even lived on 175th Street and worked in a zipper factory in the 1960s. “I feel more at home in Washington Heights than anywhere else I’ve lived,” says Mateo, 26, who grew up in Boca Raton, Fla.

So much of New York’s history has been lived, sung and reported in Spanish. With the great migration of the 1950s, what had long been a relatively small Latino community in New York became a thriving center of Puerto Rican life and culture. But in the past half century, the community has grown and diversified. Today, Mexicans, Dominicans, Ecuadoreans, Colombians, Peruvians and Cubans have joined Puerto Ricans and comprise about 30 percent of the city’s population.

Engineering Professor Vijay Modi built an interactive map of annual energy consumption in New York City. Click the image to view. Image credit: Vijay Modi, Columbia University

Over the last five years, the amount of digital information worldwide has increased almost 2,000 percent, exceeding 2.8 trillion gigabytes—perhaps as many bits of information as there are stars in the universe.

Just a few years after Lewis and Clark’s famous expedition to the great Northwest, another intrepid American set out on a journey through challenging terrain at the government’s behest. In 1808, John Randel Jr., a young surveyor, was charged with mapping Manhattan Island and laying out the street grid that, for 200 years, has shaped and spurred the growth of New York City.

(Editor's note: This story was originally published on April 20, 2011. The video was published on Feb. 20, 2013.)

Columbia University Medical Center has launched a new medical practice near Rockefeller Center, giving the commuters and visitors who stream into midtown Manhattan easy access to some of the city’s top practitioners.

Columbia’s campuses were largely spared the ravages of Hurricane Sandy, which destroyed neighborhoods, flooded tunnels, forced hospitals evacuations and knocked out power to millions throughout the region. But many in the tri-state area face a challenging path to recovery.

For two days in October, more than 20 executives of nonprofit groups in Harlem came together at Columbia Business School for a leadership training program. To Professor Ray Horton, who joined the faculty in 1970, the new Strengthening West Harlem Nonprofits program represents the ideal alignment of University expertise and his own longstanding commitment to serving the local community.

Pages

Subscribe to NewYorkStories