Lee C. Bollinger in a navy blue suit standing in front of desks.

Photo by Eileen Barroso

Only a few blocks of Broadway separate Columbia’s classic Morningside Heights campus from the transparent glass and steel structures on the University’s new campus in Manhattanville, but the contrast between the two signifies more than a shift in architectural styles.

Gillian Metzger smiling

Photo Courtesy of Columbia Law School

The U.S. Supreme Court begins its new term with a full complement of nine justices and what is "shaping up to be a big case term,” said Gillian Metzger.

Nearly a week after Puerto Rico was devastated by Hurricane Maria, the island’s 3.4 million residents face a growing humanitarian crisis. Most are still without power, food is scarce, and more than half have no access to drinkable water.

Category Four winds and a storm surge knocked out the island's electric grid and created a near-total communications blackout, leaving some towns unreachable. It’s estimated that it will take six months before power is fully restored.

Photo courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

A new study suggests that a prediction explaining the unusual brightness of some astronomical explosions, first developed by Columbia astronomers and physicists, is correct.
Columbia University Trustees Alex Navab on the left and Lu Li on the right.
“They are loyal Columbia alumni who bring with them decades of success and innovation in business and civic leadership, as well as a diversity of personal experience," said University President Lee C. Bollinger.
Charles Zuker in his office.
Neuroscientist Charles Zuker has helped identify the cells, receptors and signaling mechanisms that govern what we taste.
Anil Lalwani
Anil Lalwani wants to deliver medicine directly into the inner ear, the best way to treat ear-related disorders.
Ellen Lumpkin sits in her laboratory.

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Touch may be the hardest of the senses to study, because the skin has so many jobs to do. It parses hot from cold, contends with itches, detects pain and more.
Ken Shepard
Ken Shepard is part of a growing push to develop brain-computer interfaces to repair senses and skills lost to injury or disease.

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